Human-bonded parrotlet and two bonded green-cheek conures under one roof? - Talk Parrots Forums

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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-28-2014, 07:19 PM Thread Starter
 
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Human-bonded parrotlet and two bonded green-cheek conures under one roof?

Hello.

(I apologize if this is the wrong sub forum for this thread... I wasn't sure of the appropriate place.)

I currently care for a three year-old flighted Pacific parrotlet who has been with me for 14 months. We spend all day every day together (I work from home). We are bonded, for lack of a better term. She is a feisty bird, though generally gentle and relatively low maintenance--something of a shoulder potato.

All being as it is now, I will be bringing home two clipped green-cheeked conures tomorrow. They are bonded birds, both two years-old and healthy. These birds are extremely affectionate and sociable with humans. I admit to being a touch bowled over by their friendly initial reaction and delightful further interaction with me (hence my choosing to bring them home).

I am hoping to find advice, suggestions, and insights into how best to approach introductions, housing, etc. Even telling me this is a very bad idea will be met with appreciation.

Some bits of info:

I live alone (besides the bird).

The parrotlet is dark from 4pm to 6am every night (her choice). The conures are on a 9pm to 9am schedule.

The parrotlet lives in the main room of the house. I have a bedroom which can be used for birdy purposes if needed (while flighted, the parrotlet never ventures into the bedroom).

I have a lot of time and attention to dedicate to this endeavor, literally all day every day.

Any advice and ideas would be sincerely cherished. While I have been given some good stuff from others involved in this exchange, I would love to absorb others' experiences and insights.

Edit: I should express my desire: I would like for these birds to live together in harmony, or as close to it as possible. It would be delightful if all birds could consider my home theirs during all waking hours, with cages being more of an open refuge and sleeping space (as my parrotlet has it now). I'm hoping to work towards a dynamic where the parrotlet does not feel threatened and/or territorial and the conures feel welcome to be free in the house. If this is an absurd idea, I would like to be told so. (I've likely watched too many YouTube videos where this reality appears to exist

Thank you!

Last edited by Deresy; 02-28-2014 at 08:06 PM. Reason: Further information
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-28-2014, 07:28 PM
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to Talk Parrots Deresy.

I'm sorry to say that I can't answer your question, but I did want to welcome you to the forum.

I'm sure that some of our more knowledgeable members will be along soon, and will be able to offer you their advice.

Cheers,

John.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-28-2014, 07:32 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thank you so much, John, I appreciate the welcome.

(I apologize for not posting something more introductory elsewhere, I was being a bit eager.)
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-28-2014, 09:02 PM
 
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Hi Deresy, I had a female parrotlet who was bonded to me and I later adopted a male red rumped parakeet who desperately needed a home. This worked out quite well, but I never let them interact together without my being there. After I adopted a female red rump, who was also in a desperate situation, the two red rumps bonded to each other and became too aggressive for the parrotlet. We could all share a house together, but in separate rooms.

So, it really depends on your situation. I would advise taking it very slowly and I would advise that you always supervise the birds when they are in the same room and/or can come into contact with each other. Otherwise, somebody might lose a beak or a toe. Good luck!


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Lucy Linnie from Tribe of the Lineola
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-28-2014, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thank you so much for your response, M.

I would be sure to keep all group activity closely monitored, if the time comes where it appears appropriate to let the birds congregate freely.

Is it crazy for me to hope that I can remain bonded with the parrotlet (for her sake) while sharing space with a pair of bonded conures (whose attention I will gleefully reciprocate), and have us all cohabitate... Or am I looking forward to a life of hyper-vigilance, aggression and constant avian damage control?

I understand that each bird is of its own, though this spread of inter-species association is new to me and I am trying to figure out if I am going to be causing undue harm to all by attempting this construct.

Thank you so much, again.
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 03:28 AM


 
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Welcome! They all sound like wonderful birds. The one thing I know is that both gccs and plets are known for not getting along famously with others and a gcc could really hurt a plet. It might be a good idea to slightly clip in the beginning so that they don't land on each other's territory to brawl before a proper introduction, lol. Use your best judgement, but just know that your plet is likely to be very jealous and protective of her relationship with you. So you might want to consider her the resident bird in all respects to make her feel her place is secure with you. Spending the same amount of time with her, greeting her first, feeding her first, letting her out first, getting her a new toy if they get one, etc. Also they have each other, she only has you. Maybe you can schedule it where they get your undivided attention only after she has went to bed. Good luck and keep us posted.

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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 04:28 AM



 
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Welcome to the forum

As already stated above, both species are known to be very bird aggressive. Your pair are bonded, so I imagine that the parrotlet would be very unwelcome into their household however I do think there are ways you could work around it

Try to treat everybody equally, if you can. Obviously your parrotlet was there first and if she feels like she doesn't have you to herself any more you may find her attacking your other birds or even you out of jealousy. While she is getting to know them it would be a good idea to put a towel over the top of their cage and draped slightly down the front, so should she decide to have a look you won't have to worry about toes getting nipped

As the conures aren't currently flighted, I think it will help your parrotlet understand that they aren't a threat. They won't be able to chase her and scare her off you so fingers crossed some boundaries will be set there during that time

Perhaps have play stands etc. and different areas for the birds to go to so they're not with you all of the time? I think for now you've been your parrotlets gym, mate and flock so before getting the conures you could teach her to be more independent. When the conures come and she knows she can entertain herself she will hopefully be able to mingle with them a little bit when they're all not on you

I will just warn you though, I had a green cheek kill another green cheek. They were very, very bonded with one another and one day I heard the most horrific noises and rushed off to find out what happened. The other conure was beating up his mate but it was just too late to help. Now, if your parrotlet is going to be out with the conures you are going to have to be so so so careful, especially if they're going to be going in and out of cages. The last thing you want is for your parrotlet to get a little braver than she should and enters the conure cage!

Good luck though, I'm sure it will all work out Many of us have multiple bird households and manage fairly well, it may mean set times for certain birds coming out but it does work and they do seem to enjoy one another's company from afar

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 08:47 AM
 
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I don't have much useful advice LOL as I only have two cockatiels. However, I am curious what you do for living. (Forgive me for being nosy, but I often get a little envious of people who can work from home, lol)
It sounds like you have a wonderful relationship with your parrotlet. I will be honest though, if I were in your shoes, I would not get the GCCs. You are bound to get torn between diving attention as they most likely will not be able to share the room and fly around without attacking each other, from what I have read about both species. Why disturb the harmony?

My Fids -Candy and Tony
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 09:30 AM
 
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I have Parrotlets & Cockatiels, both of my P'lets are bonded to both myself and each other. They get along with the 'Tiels, occasional displays if they think the 'Tiels are taking their toys and stuff, but they tolerate each other with no major issues.

I had my male P'let for awhile before getting my female. She was a rescue that had been in several homes before I got her. The home I acquired her from had a GCC that had abused her. She was terrified of the 'Tiels when I brought her home, she's still scared but it's getting better because they are so gentle.

I honestly think that it just depends on the particular bird and it's personality, but what I know about GCC's and P'lets hasn't been positive. I wouldn't concern myself with the bond between you and the birds, if it's strong and you continue to spend time with your P'let then I think you will do fine. I would be more concerned with the birds interactions among themselves.

You will have a month or so that they are quarantined from your P'let, keep them within hearing distance, but not near each other. They will learn each others sounds that way, then once out of quarantine you can introduce them. I would NEVER leave them alone with your P'let. They can be aggressive, but the Conures are too and much larger. I know someone who's P'let only has 1 eye from just an accidental injury with another bird (wasn't conure but still was one of her other babies). Good luck with your new Fids.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 10:20 AM


 
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Yes, the little ones mommy is right. You have, at the very least, a couple of weeks that you will need to leave the GCCs in their cage so they can get used to their new home, human, diet, routine (I would suggest you put them on the same fabulous schedule your plet is, much healthier for them!) and you can observe how your plet reacts to them. Personally, I think that your plet will continue exactly the same relationship with you and will not be interested in the GCCs. The GCCs might get a bit nasty with the plet (flying over to his cage and trying to bite toes, face, etc) but, as they are bonded to each other, once they settle down and see that the plet is no threat to their own relationship and mostly ignores them, they will start ignoring her too. But, of course, you will have to watch them like a hawk until you can ascertain that this is the case.
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thank you all so much for the fantastic thoughts, ideas, experiences, and suggestions. (I didn't have time to respond earlier, though I was reading and absorbing things you were writing before the day unfolded.)

I was having a lot of doubt and concern (especially in regards to the parrotlet's reaction), though I decided to bring home the conures... And here they are.

Things could not have gone more smoothly so far. While we were organizing everything (the conure cage is absolutely huge), the birds became fully aware of each other and everything has been just fine. My parrotlet seemed to need a lot of reassurance from me in the way of snuggles and scrinches during the first hour, and the conures were a little excited at first when the parrotlet flew by, though everyone has settled in and seems relatively calm.

The parrotlet certainly seems uninterested in the conures, and the conures seem surprisingly at ease with being here. We'll be taking things very slowly and I anticipate some rough spots, but so far things are quite good--far and away better than I had prepared myself for.

I am so grateful for all of the responses to my question, thank you each and everyone. I feel so much more prepared and aware of what I need to do to be vigilant and maintain safety as well as remaining in awe of how magical these creatures are accompanied with an undying respect for their position within my home.

Thanks again, I hope I don't need to pester you all with constant questions regarding this new-to-me experience in the future
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-02-2014, 11:33 AM



 
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I'm glad everything has gone so well for you

I will say though, that having them together immediately may be a very bad choice. I have done it many a time and have had to suffer the consequences of what appear to be healthy birds giving my flock horrible disease. Psittacosis is extremely common and a lot of birds are carrying it. Being as they're now all together, I do recommend that you disease test one of the conures just to be on the safe side. Better to be safe than sorry! I've been sorry too many times and to see it happen to others is just terrible I don't mean to put a downer on everything, but imagine what could happen

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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-02-2014, 11:46 AM


 
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Daisy is absolutely, 100% correct. Quarantine AND testing for disease is a must (parrots can 'carry' a disease and pass it to others without having any symptoms or becoming sick themselves) with new birds.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-02-2014, 01:17 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thank you so much for the words of warning and display of concern.

The conures were given a clean bill of health by an avian doc before they came here, and the parrotlet was at the vet for a check-up three weeks ago.

So I think everything is alright health-wise, barring any unforeseen issues.

Thanks again for the concern and kind thoughts.

Last edited by Deresy; 03-02-2014 at 01:21 PM. Reason: Clarity
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-02-2014, 01:57 PM



 
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It's great they've already been done You see so many people get birds and stick them together without realizing that although they LOOK healthy, they may not be! I have done it many a time and it took me such a long time to learn my lesson

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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-02-2014, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
 
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Yes, if I did anything to directly jeopardize the health of my parrotlet it would be difficult for me to ever forgive myself.

I am living with a sincere trepidation for the day in which free introductions between the birds occurs. There is part of me that worries I have made a mistake bringing the conures here, though I had become acutely concerned that the day in and day out solitary relationship between the parrotlet and I was becoming quite unhealthy in of itself... For both of us.
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