New Rainbow Lorikeet - Talk Parrots Forums

Talk Parrots General General parrot discussion, questions, help and information.

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-28-2015, 11:44 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Smile New Rainbow Lorikeet

Hello! i have placed an order for a baby rainbow lorikeet in a breeder. The breeder said I can bring him/her home 8-10 weeks from now, when he/she is weaned (the bird will be 12 or so weeks old by then). I have been told that breeders do not wean to good diets, and I would still have to hand-feed the bird. Is this true?

Last edited by Gabriel; 03-29-2015 at 06:17 AM.
Gabriel is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-29-2015, 04:21 PM


 
Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Outer Sydney Australia
Age: 67
Posts: 887
Thanks: 135
Thanked 235 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 36
                     
Most breeders that I know wean their birds onto the same food that they hand raise them with. We don't use a standard hand raising mix to feed babies but rather a standard Lorikeet wet mix food mixed to the correct temperature. Lorikeets being Nectar and Pollen eaters there is really no weaning involved, just teaching them how to eat out of a container instead of being fed by either spoon, syringe or crop needle. It's a bit like teaching a puppy or kitten to lap milk, you push their beak into the food and they figure it out pretty quickly. I start by feeding it at the same temperature I would use for hand feeding and then gradually mix it with with cooler water down to cold water. Unlike a seed eater which can take at least 2 weeks for them to learn how to eat seed properly from the liquid diet they are hand raised with, it takes a lorikeet only a few days to figure out how to feed themselves.

Like a seed eater it may take them some time to learn how to eat fruit and vegetables but I like to add some human baby food into their hand raising mix. I have found it makes it easier to introduce fruit and vegetables into their diet when weaned. I use baby food like pear and banana, apple and mango, sweet potato pumpkin and corn. Not only does it give them a bit of variety in their hand raising mix, they know the flavour of those foods when I introduce it to them when weaned.

I wean onto wet food the same as I hand raise with and also have a container of dry food in the cage with them. They soon figure out they can eat that and drink water out of their water container. As weaned birds I usually feed dry all the time and only give them wet when they are breeding. With our hot summers it is more convenient for me and the birds to have dry food as it won't sour on a hot day and they have food all day long and can eat whenever they feel like it.
Kate is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Kate For This Useful Post:
clawnz (04-04-2015), Gabriel (03-29-2015)
post #3 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-29-2015, 06:24 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Smile

Thanks for the reply, just what I needed to know. So, the lorikeets will basically figure out how to eat dry food on their own, right?

Slave to.. Coco Nala
Gabriel is offline  
 
post #4 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-29-2015, 11:38 PM


 
Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Outer Sydney Australia
Age: 67
Posts: 887
Thanks: 135
Thanked 235 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 36
                     
Yes they usually do, but make sure they are still getting their wet mix daily until you are sure they are eating the dry. You can let them just have dry all day and in the afternoon give them some wet just to make sure. You will soon notice if they are eating the dry as when they eat it they go from the powder to the water, so some of the dry gets into the water. And the dry will disappear quite rapidly, depending on the size of the container.

Also make sure they have plenty of water but make sure the container is of a size that they can stand up in. Lorikeets love to bathe and they get absolutely drenched. To the extend they find it difficult to fly. You don't want a container so deep that they could drown. Mine bathe all year round. Maybe only every two days in winter but they still bathe. Not pleasant on a cold night if I have one inside near me and you get icy cold water down the back of the neck or in the face.

They will often not bathe as young birds though. It takes them a little bit of time to figure that one out.
Kate is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Kate For This Useful Post:
Gabriel (03-30-2015)
post #5 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-30-2015, 04:28 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I know this depends on the individual, but does a 12 week old rainbow generally still need to be hand-fed?

Slave to.. Coco Nala
Gabriel is offline  
post #6 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-30-2015, 08:23 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
It's been a 2 weeks since the bird was due to hatch and the breeder was supposed to inform me, but he hasn't, so I am slightly concerned. I have tried calling them, but the breeder I met up with last time was not there, and they would call me back in a while. I have not received any calls regarding the bird.. what can I do?

Slave to.. Coco Nala
Gabriel is offline  
post #7 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-30-2015, 04:11 PM


 
Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Outer Sydney Australia
Age: 67
Posts: 887
Thanks: 135
Thanked 235 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 36
                     
No a 12 week old does not need hand feeding. Unlike a seed eater that has to get to a certain age before they can start to wean. But because a lorikeets diet is so different to a seed eater they basically go from a wet feeding to wet feeding, they just have to learn how to feed themselves instead of you giving it to them. The only weaning necessary is to get them to eat dry food. So lorikeets can wean at a much younger age than a seed eater.

All you can do really is wait for the breeder to contact you, or you keep trying to contact them. Lorikeets can be funny breeders and since I don't know where you are it is hard to guess what the problem is. I know that pairs will mate and lay eggs in preparation for young. But if they don't get rain at the correct time they may destroy the eggs or even dispose of the chicks. Because their diet is so specialised especially in the wild, if they consider there will not be enough food around they will not bring chicks up and waste their energy and restricted resources on the chicks. Even though they are being bred in captivity and food is plentiful as compared to wild birds, part of their brain will still take the weather into consideration. It has happened to me twice this year so far with a pair of Scaly Breasted Lorikeets. First with the one chick they hatched and the second with the 2 eggs they were incubating. They had a constant supply of dry food, wet mix every afternoon and fruit and vegetables and always had water. Where I am we just don't seem to be getting the rain at the right time. And lorikeets can breed all year round, most of the species only have 2 chicks at a time. I haven't even had many wild young visiting this year. All the birds I have had visiting my yard have been mature birds. Rainbows breed all around me.
Kate is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Kate For This Useful Post:
Gabriel (04-01-2015)
post #8 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-31-2015, 06:57 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
How can I tell if a bird's crop is empty or full (or if it needs feeding)? Sorry for so many questions...

Slave to.. Coco Nala
Gabriel is offline  
post #9 of 75 (permalink) Old 03-31-2015, 07:37 AM


 
Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Outer Sydney Australia
Age: 67
Posts: 887
Thanks: 135
Thanked 235 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 36
                     
With an unfeathered bird it is very easy as you can see the crop and how much is in it. When the bird is feathered it is much harder. But seeing the bird will be hand raised you can actually feel if the crop is full or empty. The crop is a muscular pouch between the throat and the abdomen. It expands to take the food where it is partially digested before passing down into the birds stomach or gizzard.

No problem about the questions. If you don't ask questions you never learn.
Kate is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Kate For This Useful Post:
Gabriel (04-03-2015)
post #10 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-01-2015, 05:55 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Do you have any tips on hand feeding lorikeets? I know it is a must that you use the same formula as the breeder previously did, but I am unsure of the method. I am asking this because I have been informed that juvenile birds tend to regress when moving to a new home. Someone suggested to let the bird stay at the breeder for a while longer, maybe 2-3 weeks so the bird is fully weaned. My budgies did not regress when I brought them home, so I think it is unlikely my rainbow will. However, this might be because my budgies were 3.5 months old when I brought them home. Any help on this would be highly appreciated.

Slave to.. Coco Nala

Last edited by Gabriel; 04-01-2015 at 06:26 PM.
Gabriel is offline  
post #11 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-02-2015, 03:55 PM


 
Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Outer Sydney Australia
Age: 67
Posts: 887
Thanks: 135
Thanked 235 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 36
                     
It would depend on how the breeder was hand raising the bird. If they were using a syringe or a crop needle the bird may not take to a spoon, and unless you are very experienced a novice should not attempt using a crop needle. Temperature is going to vary as well. If using a syringe or crop needle the temperature is lower than if using a spoon or the bird may not be used to a temperature higher than what it is being fed at even with a spoon. I found when using the spoon to feed that the birds like their food at a higher temperature and never feed at lower than 45C but syringe or crop needle at 40C. All the books say no higher than 40C but I found through trial and error that all birds like their food hotter if using a spoon. All the lectures I saw on hand raising also said 40C. Many breeders will not let a bird leave their aviaries unless it is eating well on its own. I won't unless I know the person is experience with hand raising birds. If anything happens to the bird their reputation is at stake.

Personally I like using a spoon and only use a crop needle now if I have to force feed a bird or have lots of birds to do and time is a factor. Spoon feeding is more hands on and takes longer, so the bird is being handled for a longer period at each feed. Most breeders do not have the time to play with chicks a lot and unless they have children that are prepared to play with chicks between feeds as to how quiet they are when they go to their new home. I am on my own so don't really have the ability to socialize my birds with lots of people so my babies may be very quiet with me, but be a bit stand offish with people they don't know. They soon get over that though with handling.

Lorikeets are a different kettle of fish to a seed eating bird, especially budgies who don't really need hand raising to tame. Young lorikeets play rough with each other and often will play rough with their human owners. What some humans consider a bird being aggressive and biting is often just a lorikeet playing. Lorikeets beaks are very sharp and strong even at a young age and even Lorikeet play can draw blood. It is a common saying among lorikeet owners that if you have a pet bird at some stage you are going to lose blood. They are hyperactive cheeky birds and I am sure they have a sense of humour. I still think Lorikeets are the clowns of the parrot world and can be very easily amused. I use the cardboard centre from the toilet paper roll as a toy and they love playing with them. Also empty drink cans. Most like swings and will play on them. They love hanging upside down often hanging on with one toe nail.

It is not possible to tell if the bird will regress, there are so many variables. It can depend on how much they are played with, if their parents were hand raised, the individual birds temperament being just a few variables.
Kate is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Kate For This Useful Post:
Gabriel (04-03-2015)
post #12 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-04-2015, 07:22 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I just visited the breeder today, but unfortunately the person I met up with wasn't there, so a staff member said they'll call me tomorrow and inform me of the status of the chick. While I was there, I checked out some of the hand-raised birds, which were extremely friendly and seemed to have no fear of hands! I saw that quite a few of the cages had natural wood perches, I was wondering how large ( diameter ) they should generally be, and what types of wood do lorikeets enjoy ( hope this makes sense.. )? I have a lemon tree in my backyard, and I believe birds love pecking away at citrus wood.

Slave to.. Coco Nala

Last edited by Gabriel; 04-04-2015 at 07:27 AM.
Gabriel is offline  
post #13 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-04-2015, 03:00 PM


 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Auckland NZ
Posts: 464
Thanks: 129
Thanked 287 Times in 179 Posts
Rep Power: 15
             
Kate has been doing a great job helping you with all of your questions.
I love the fact that you are so keen and willing to open up and ask questions.
You are going to do well.
Keeping a check on their weights is also a good idea.

Woods.
http://www.mdvaden.com/bird_page.shtml


A tribute to my lost ones. RIP.
clawnz is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to clawnz For This Useful Post:
Kate (04-04-2015)
post #14 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-04-2015, 03:54 PM


 
Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Outer Sydney Australia
Age: 67
Posts: 887
Thanks: 135
Thanked 235 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 36
                     
Thank you Clive. You are right it is great to see someone asking questions and then listening to the advice given and not ignoring it thinking they know better. Great article on safe and unsafe woods.

Personally I try to use natural eucalyptus branches and Lorikeets like all sizes right down to flimsy twigs. In the wild they will literally hang off a leaf to get at a flower. If you are pruning a grevillea or bottle brush you could give them the prunings to climb around on. No need to remove leaves or flowers as they will enjoy them as well. So if you are going to use leaves, flowers or fruit just make sure they are bird safe as well. That is one reason I use eucalyptus, grevillea or bottlebrush.
Kate is offline  
post #15 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-04-2015, 05:41 PM


 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Auckland NZ
Posts: 464
Thanks: 129
Thanked 287 Times in 179 Posts
Rep Power: 15
             
Kate.
We are so lucky down this end of the world. We have so many shrubs and terrs to offer them.
I go for Paperbark gum (they love stripping this one), or Manuka (tea tree) as my first options for gyms and branches.
But yes Bottlebrush, Pohutakawa, Banksia, give them great chewing as well as the flowers and seeds. There are a load more we get that are not listed on any sites I have found.
I am not into the American way. Strip naked, cook to sanitize. A quick wash at best, but most times cut and give it to them as is.

I have just found my note on this list. Put together by a person who spent some time compiling one of the most comprehensive lists I know of.
Good & Bad.
http://www.parrot-and-conure-world.c...for-birds.html


A tribute to my lost ones. RIP.

Last edited by clawnz; 04-04-2015 at 06:13 PM. Reason: Added Link
clawnz is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to clawnz For This Useful Post:
Kate (04-05-2015)
post #16 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-05-2015, 07:21 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Wow, thanks a lot! Just the information I needed. I have the decision of choosing a normal rainbow or a scaly cross rainbow lorikeet. The rainbows haven't hatched, but the scaly/rainbow's have already hatched.
Which should I choose..???

Slave to.. Coco Nala
Gabriel is offline  
post #17 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-05-2015, 07:28 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Also, the URL you sent ( http://www.parrot-and-conure-world.c...for-birds.html ) said that you should scrub the branches with a non-toxic disinfectant. Is this necessary, or would a rinse and scrub with water be fine? In the case that I would need a disinfectant, would using vinegar be alright?

Slave to.. Coco Nala
Gabriel is offline  
post #18 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-05-2015, 02:48 PM


 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Auckland NZ
Posts: 464
Thanks: 129
Thanked 287 Times in 179 Posts
Rep Power: 15
             
I know, there will also ways be conflicting information. And to be honest they are covering all bases by saying You need to do this.

You can scrub with Hot water and a little dishwashing liquid, rinse and leave in the sun to dry.
You are looking to make sure there is no pooh on it from birds in the wild.
Molds and rotten woods are another thing to look out for.
No drift wood from the sea, due to salt and bugs that may have bored into it. If it comes from fresh water and is fully dry and sun bleached it could be considered.
Vinegar. Thats Apple Cider.
Myself I would use something a lot stronger if I was trying to sanitise something. Vinegar is a bit weak for my liking.


A tribute to my lost ones. RIP.
clawnz is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to clawnz For This Useful Post:
Kate (04-05-2015)
post #19 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-05-2015, 05:25 PM


 
Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Outer Sydney Australia
Age: 67
Posts: 887
Thanks: 135
Thanked 235 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 36
                     
It would have to be up to you Gabriel as to which one you choose. I have Scaly's and Rainbows. Many people will choose the pure Rainbow over a pure Scaly as the Rainbows are much more colourful. Scaly's are pretty plain until they lift up their wings and you see that brilliant red/orange under the wings. Temperament wise they are very similar and many of the colours that we now have originated through the Scaly. So they occurred as a spontaneous mutation in the Scaly and they then cross bred them over the other species to get the colour and then put the coloured offspring back to normal birds, so hybrid Scaly/Rainbow mutation back to normal Rainbow. Hope that makes sense.

With a hybrid Scaly/Rainbow ideally a hybrid should exhibit 50% of each parent, but it is possible for a hybrid to look more like one parent or the other. One of the things about lorikeet hybrids is that they are fertile and can reproduce, unlike hybrids from many of the seed eating birds that when cross bred the offspring are mules and cannot reproduce.

Personally I don't bother about the sanitation of perches either. In my opinion, and this is just my opinion, we tend to try to sanitize things far too much. Dirt never hurt us as kids and at least we got small doses of germs to help us build up a good functioning immune system. Now days we are inoculated against everything and scrubbed to within an inch of our lives. Not saying that inoculations is a bad thing but I don't think we need to keep things so sterile.

Birds get so much enjoyment from stripping the bark off their perches I don't think it is right to deprive them of that joy. I have many wild birds around me, including wild Rainbows and my birds are more likely to get an illness from them kissing my birds through the wire than from the perches. The wild ones get on my suspended aviaries all the time and play with my lorikeets.

One of the main perches I use is the branches of the crepe myrtle. They are safe for birds, are a good hard wood so they last longer than many of the perches made from softer wood. They also seem to branch off in all different directions and diameters so they give the birds good foot exercise. It doesn't really have a bark but the different sizes are great for the birds. The other one I try to get, which is not always easy is Iron Bark. This one has plenty of bark for the birds to chew and is really hard wood that even a Cockatoo has difficulty chewing through. Another good one is Casuarina or She Oak as it is also called.
Kate is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Kate For This Useful Post:
clawnz (05-20-2015)
post #20 of 75 (permalink) Old 04-06-2015, 05:16 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: South Perth, Western Australia
Age: 19
Posts: 45
Thanks: 13
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I have a heap of toys in my garage I store in a sort of plastic tub. I have these toys made of wood which I might use for toys for my bird. The wood has this glossy/shiny coating, is this safe to use as a toy? Also, a lot of the toys are painted, and I'm not sure if the paint is safe to use.

Slave to.. Coco Nala

Last edited by Gabriel; 04-06-2015 at 08:59 AM.
Gabriel is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Gabriel For This Useful Post:
Kate (04-06-2015)
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Talk Parrots Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome