Costs Associated with Adopting/Owning a Parrot - Talk Parrots Forums

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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-16-2012, 03:38 AM Thread Starter


 
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Costs Associated with Adopting/Owning a Parrot

In order to help you in your decision to adopt a parrot, we've compiled a list of the approximate costs of items or services needed once you bring your bird home. You will need to purchase many of these items in advance of your bird coming to live with you. It is important that you consider the overall cost of bringing an avian companion home with you.


  • Small Parrots: Budgie, Lovebird, Cockatiel
  • Medium Parrots: Conure, Ringneck Parakeet, Senegal
  • Large Parrots: Amazon, African Grey, Small Cockatoo
  • X-large Parrot: Macaw and Large Cockatoo

Note: These costs are just estimates. Some costs will run higher and some might run lower. It all depends on how many tests you want to do and how thorough you want to be. Remember that birds hide illness well and catching an illness early may save your bird's life. Complete Blood Counts and Chemistry Panels are a good place to start for yearly exams. We can't stress enough how IMPORTANT it is to have a GREAT vet that you trust and also some back up vets for emergencies in case your vet isn't available. Don't have a vet for your bird? Check out our page on How to Find an Avian Veterinarian.

Toys: Remember you need enough so that you can rotate weekly and have toys from at least 3 of the toy groups. You can save money in this area by making some of your own toys. This can be a fun thing for you and your feathered friend to do together. He or she can sit with you while you make the toy(s) and can help. Remember some toys are made to be destroyed, so you should be happy if your toys are showing wear as that means that they are liked and being used.

Play-gyms/T-stands/Perches/Cages: Play gyms and T-stands are nice to have located in different areas of your house where you spend time. T-stands are a scaled down version of a play-gym can can be used places where your bird doesn't spend as much time. A t-stand usually has cups for food and/or water and areas for toys to keep your bird a bit occupied. To save money, you can make your own T-stand from PVC pipes and fittings. These items are necessary so that your bird can spend time outside of his or her cage and can flap and exercise. Please remember that supervision is still necessary. Your bird may decide to destroy something or become injured or worse, if left unattended while playing outside their cage.

A perch for a shower stall is nice if you think that your bird might want to take a shower with you. Be sure that no soap or other products get on your bird's feathers. You can also put your bird on the perch in the shower stall and turn on the water for him even if you aren't in the shower. This is nice because all the water stays in the shower. You know what we mean if you ever saw a bird really enjoying their bath.

A boing or boinger is that cotton covered spiral toy that birds just love. They are nice because it's another area for your feathered friend to play on and sit on while you watch TV or read a book.

Remember to get a good quality cage that will last the test of time. Your feathered friend may live a long time (especially if he or she is a large parrot), so it's wise to invest in a good quality cage. Remember that the bar spacing has to be suitable for the kind of bird that you plan house in there. No one wants to buy a cage and go away for a few hours to come home and find out that his or her parrot has broken out of the cage and did some artistic carving of the woodwork and trim.

Disinfectant: This is needed to clean the cage/play gyms/T-stands. Most disinfectants used on T-stands or cages should be outdoors or away from our feathered kids. GSE (Grapefruit Seed Extract) is safe to be used around birds and is an antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral. Purchase it at Nutriteam.com. There are many other bird safe disenfectants on the market, and you need to use something.

Food: this refers to a pelleted diet. Remember to look for a kind that does not have sucrose or corn syrup listed as one of the top ingredients. This is sugar and is not good for your bird. This is NOT taking into account the fruits and vegetables that you should be feeding your avian companion. See our section on Diet.

Veterinary Costs: This may depend on where you chose to purchase your bird. If you buy an inexpensive bird from a non-reputable source, it no doubt will cost you more money in the long run. It is always much better to buy a bird from a reputable, reliable source because you will actually be getting a better, more socialized bird. And if they truly care about the bird, they will want you to keep in touch and give them periodic updates of how the bird is doing. If you have any questions or encounter any problems, this is always a good place to start to ask for help.


Costs Associated with Adopting/Owning a Parrot
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-16-2012, 04:34 AM



 
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This is probably my favourite one you have posted. We have many people come here looking for what to get to start off with and this does give a brilliant idea! I think I must spend more than that though

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-16-2012, 05:43 AM
 
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I would like to make a disclaimer on the food part of this: An all-pelleted diet (as suggested in the above article) or an all-seed diet is not good for our birds. In the long run, being on a diet that lacks variety will cause liver issues from excess protein (pellets) or excess fat (seeds). The ideal parrot diet is full of variety. Most veterinarians push for an all-pellet diet often because they sell the product or because the vet school they went to taught them that an all-pellet diet was correct. This, however, is not the case.

In my own and others' experience, a good diet for parrots consists of seed, pellets, and veggies/fruits. At the very least a parrot's diet should consist of seed and veggies/fruits if you do not wish to feed pellets.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-16-2012, 05:48 AM Thread Starter


 
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I can't add any kind any info to it as it isn't mine, otherwise I would have, but at least with a disclaimer posted, I hope that it is noted as well.

Me too, Daisy!
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-16-2012, 01:12 PM
 
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A fantastic list and excellent points. I will be referring to this list as I prepare to bring home my eclectus over the next few years.

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-16-2012, 04:09 PM



 
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Hope nobody minds me sticking this (and another two). I thought other members may find it a lot easier and obviously these are brilliant!

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-16-2012, 04:47 PM
 
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I think this is the most helpfull because when I stated looking for pricing and ended up doing a lot of math over and over again. This is super simple!


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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-18-2012, 06:17 AM


 
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It also allows for people to budget for their new additions

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-28-2013, 02:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjknight93 View Post
I would like to make a disclaimer on the food part of this: An all-pelleted diet (as suggested in the above article) or an all-seed diet is not good for our birds. In the long run, being on a diet that lacks variety will cause liver issues from excess protein (pellets) or excess fat (seeds). The ideal parrot diet is full of variety. Most veterinarians push for an all-pellet diet often because they sell the product or because the vet school they went to taught them that an all-pellet diet was correct. This, however, is not the case.

In my own and others' experience, a good diet for parrots consists of seed, pellets, and veggies/fruits. At the very least a parrot's diet should consist of seed and veggies/fruits if you do not wish to feed pellets.
I agree completely with you. I give my too a variety as well. Twice a week I mix in a small amount of seed mix to his veggies, fruites and or pelletes. He is a really good eater due to the variety of food I feed him.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-28-2013, 03:32 PM
 
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As mentioned before, these costs are estimates, and I find, on the lower end. Here in Canada, toys for small guys run much higher than that cost, and shower perches run about 30 dollars. Different countries have different costs...



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