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Thread Description: Anyone use them? How? When?

 
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 06:53 PM Thread Starter


 
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Probiotics

I have seen some foods (like goldenfeast) that have probiotics added to them. In recent years, companies have even started adding them to almost all dog and cat food. Do you use them for your birds? How often? I bought the Avitech probiotic (I think it is called AviBios) and I just need to find out more info. Thanks guys.
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 07:42 PM


 
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Personally I think it's just a gimmick. I know some people swear by them, but I wouldn't put too much stock into the cure-all that some say they are. On the other hand, I don't think they're harmful.

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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 01:42 PM
 
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I don't put any additives in my bird food because they are fed healthy food. I know they also make humans think they need this as well, but it's still a gimmick to make money.

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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 05:17 PM Thread Starter


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemini1 View Post
I don't put any additives in my bird food because they are fed healthy food. I know they also make humans think they need this as well, but it's still a gimmick to make money.
It did help me. I had chronic urinary tract infections (1 every few months). I started taking them everyday one the recommendation of my doctor) and I haven't had one since jan '12.

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 10:54 AM


 
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It's not a gimmick. Most of the immune system is in the intestines and a proper balance between good and bad bacteria is essential to good health. Now, if our parrots were living in the wild, without any stress (which depresses the immune system) and eating their natural diet, they would not need any type of supplement but they are not. They live under a lot of stress due to the very unnatural conditions that captivity implies as well as eating a completely unnatural diet. And, unfortunately, the greatest majority of them eat mostly pellets/seeds/nuts and not enough fresh produce, and even the fresh produce they eat is not the organic, ripen in the plant kind (which is the best source of natural probiotics) and under 'too clean' conditions (when we clean, we kill the bad as well as the good bacteria) so probiotics are one thing that everybody should incorporate into their parrots diet. Probiotics are good bacteria, the one that keeps the bad bacteria in check so it doesn't reproduce to unhealthy numbers as well as helping break down certain elements in food so they can be absorbed properly AND contributing to the production of certain vitamins.

My parrots get probiotics twice a week mixed with their gloop but not the avian kind (now, that's a gimmick!), I buy the human kind that has the most number of strains because I figure that, as we don't really know which strains they naturally have, providing a wider range has to help.
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 12:09 PM



 
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I put a pinch of AviPro Plus on my fresh foods twice a week

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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 02:23 PM Thread Starter


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by petiteoiseau View Post
It's not a gimmick. Most of the immune system is in the intestines and a proper balance between good and bad bacteria is essential to good health. Now, if our parrots were living in the wild, without any stress (which depresses the immune system) and eating their natural diet, they would not need any type of supplement but they are not. They live under a lot of stress due to the very unnatural conditions that captivity implies as well as eating a completely unnatural diet. And, unfortunately, the greatest majority of them eat mostly pellets/seeds/nuts and not enough fresh produce, and even the fresh produce they eat is not the organic, ripen in the plant kind (which is the best source of natural probiotics) and under 'too clean' conditions (when we clean, we kill the bad as well as the good bacteria) so probiotics are one thing that everybody should incorporate into their parrots diet. Probiotics are good bacteria, the one that keeps the bad bacteria in check so it doesn't reproduce to unhealthy numbers as well as helping break down certain elements in food so they can be absorbed properly AND contributing to the production of certain vitamins.

My parrots get probiotics twice a week mixed with their gloop but not the avian kind (now, that's a gimmick!), I buy the human kind that has the most number of strains because I figure that, as we don't really know which strains they naturally have, providing a wider range has to help.
Well, I am sure birds in the wild have stress lol. Caused from a different source, but definitely plently of stress.

What is gloop?

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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-18-2014, 11:54 PM


 
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Probiotics maybe useful after using Anti Biotics to quickly bring up the good gut flora.
It does not need to be special caps and you can use any pro biotic yogurt to achieve this.
I would not gibe my birds anything without reason as I believe in feeding a good varied diet and keep things as natural as possible. And I can show the results of this.
It is true if some companies had their way we would live on additives and not natural ones either.
I am so glad I live in a country where you can still buy things that have not been messed with.


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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-19-2014, 11:18 AM
 
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If I took all the vitamins, minerals, herbs and additives that are out there and supposedly that I am lacking, I would be too full to eat I don't have any problems with my digestive track, so for me if it isn't broke I don't need to fix it. Also taking too much of a good thing can be just as harmful for humans, animals and also birds. My birds poop just fine, and are already healthy. When I was a nurse we had drug companies come around with the newest and better medications, yes, herbs too try. At the same time bringing us candy, donuts and the like, bribery. And I'm happy for those that have found things to improve your birds health

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-19-2014, 03:30 PM


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4thebirds View Post
Well, I am sure birds in the wild have stress lol. Caused from a different source, but definitely plently of stress.

What is gloop?
Actually, no. Wild parrots don't live under stress. For one thing, they hardly have any natural predators (well, except for man, of course) and, for another, as most species are canope dwellers, no predator can reach them unless they are on the ground and studies have shown that , when they feed on the ground, they 'post' a watch (birds take turns positioning themselves on the outside of the flock to look for danger) so the other birds can eat without a worry. Add their natural habitat, natural diet, natural biorhythms, the protection of an entire flock and you get very little to no stress at all.

Gloop is a dish made with cooked grains, pulses and veggies.
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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-19-2014, 06:43 PM Thread Starter


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by petiteoiseau View Post
Actually, no. Wild parrots don't live under stress. For one thing, they hardly have any natural predators (well, except for man, of course) and, for another, as most species are canope dwellers, no predator can reach them unless they are on the ground and studies have shown that , when they feed on the ground, they 'post' a watch (birds take turns positioning themselves on the outside of the flock to look for danger) so the other birds can eat without a worry. Add their natural habitat, natural diet, natural biorhythms, the protection of an entire flock and you get very little to no stress at all.

Gloop is a dish made with cooked grains, pulses and veggies.
Wild animals indeed do face stress everyday. There maybe some species of birds that do not have many predators, but most do. Certain birds will even be attacked by other birds, steal their eggs, etc. Birds can be prey for all types of animals and there are many animals smart enough to catch them at their most vulnerable moment, usually young chicks in the nest. So the threat of attack promotes a constant low level of vigilance and stress. A wild animals life is spent all day every day looking for food, trying to stay alive, and keep their babies alive. I would say that is pretty stressful. But I see your point about birds in captivity because a certain amount of stress is actually healthy and most birds in activity are just bored--that in itself can bring about stress. Stress keeps us busy and it keeps us feeling a sense of purpose and accomplishment. To thrive, living things need just the right amount of stress-not too little and not too much.
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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-20-2014, 02:30 PM


 
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Yes, many birds are prey to other animals, including other birds, but parrots don't have that many predators. See this: http://vtpb-www2.cvm.tamu.edu/bright...%20parrots.htm The main predator to parrots is man.

But, aside from that, animals do not live in constant fear of death (their brains don't work like that, only humans dwell on that kind of thing) so they don't stress out over it. They understand the concept of time (both past and future -there are studies that prove this) but they pretty much live for the moment. And predators are not the bogeyman of the wild, they are actually necessary for the health of the species and watching out for them becomes second nature meaning there is caution but not real stress.. it's like when you cross a busy street with the light in red, you are very, very careful and watch both ways many times but you are not really stressed out about it. And foraging is not stressful to them, quite the contrary, it's actually a social activity they enjoy.

Humans have a different concept of what is stressful and what is not than animals. We worry about probabilities and what iffs, we dwell on imponderables and brood over problems but they don't, they just live the reality of the moment so, if one day they did not get quite enough to eat, they don't stay awake all night thinking that if they don't find food soon they will die, they just go to sleep and wait for the morning. Kind of like a 'The sun will come out tomorrow' philosophy - LOL
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