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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-18-2014, 08:03 AM Thread Starter


 
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A question about UV full spectrum lighting

Does anyone know if it's effective if I put UV avian strip light on the side of the cage, or has it got to be on top of the cage for the birds to benefit from the UV? Pictures below is how I arrange my UV avian strip light and UV avian bulb.




Senegal Duke basking in the sun

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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-19-2014, 03:33 PM


 
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I put my FS and my UV lights in the ceiling fixtures. I don't like them close to their eyes... I know of two birds that went blind because of the avian lamps that clamp on the cages.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-19-2014, 04:03 PM Thread Starter


 
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Thanks for answering Bibi. I'm going to have to clamp the light further away from the birds' eyes.

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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-21-2014, 04:57 AM



 
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I'd of said put them on the ceiling Can I ask where you got the strip from please? I'm gutting out the outdoor building where my current indoor aviaries are at the moment this year to make it in to a safe bird room and I really wanted an avian specific strip in there. Also, how long do you keep them on for if they were on the ceiling? Would it be okay to have it on for natural daylight hours? My outdoor birds are under the sun all day so I can't see why it wouldn't be a problem but I thought I'd ask you just in case. I know little about it

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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-21-2014, 07:50 AM Thread Starter


 
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I do want to put it on the ceiling but I have a triple stack cage and it only works if I put the light strip at the front of the cages.

Here is where I got my UV fluorescent strip from - mine is a 4 footer http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ARCADIA-BI...item337c28fd4e

You'll need to buy a high frequency fluorescent batten for the light works at it best. Here is where I got my high frequency fluorescent batten from, cheapest place I can find to buy this http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Manufact...ngs/index.html

I also just bought a tube reflector to go with the flruorescent strip, you don't have to use one if you don't want to http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_tr...at=0&_from=R40

Here is a video link to how to fit the UV light strip My Edited Video - YouTube

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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-21-2014, 07:56 AM Thread Starter


 
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In the video link it will explain everything you need to know about the UV light strip. It says on the video the tube will last 2 years but I have checked on the Arcadia site and they say the strip only last 1 year. I am going to replace my light tube every year.


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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-21-2014, 07:59 AM Thread Starter


 
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-21-2014, 09:17 AM



 
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Thank you! That helps so much

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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 05:41 AM
 
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how many of those UV lights do you think I would need for seven birds? I have the smaller birds in the bird room and the three bigger birds in the living room. How close do the lights have to be to give the vitamin d benefits

H
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 09:24 AM


 
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Don't count on the UV lighting for vit D3 production because they never provide that much. (in order for them to work for this purpose you have to put them VERY close to them which is very dangerous). I keep mine on an extra overhead ceiling fixture (the 'normal' one has the full spectrum lights). I know of a couple of birds that went blind with the UV lights on the 'clamp-on-cage' fixtures so I never use them.
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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 11:03 AM Thread Starter


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainbow*Russ View Post
how many of those UV lights do you think I would need for seven birds? I have the smaller birds in the bird room and the three bigger birds in the living room. How close do the lights have to be to give the vitamin d benefits
I have 2 UV lights and I rotate them between the birds daily. I have 10 birds in six cages.


The Importance of Ultra Violet Light in Birds - YouTube



This type of UV lamp is probably more ideal for you, it's easier for you to rotate this type between cages.


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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 03:31 PM
 
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awesome, and what do you use the full spectrum lighting for Tippa?

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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-01-2014, 03:50 PM Thread Starter


 
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Copy and paste

I use full spectrum lighting because

FULL SPECTRUM LIGHTING has been shown to be beneficial to birds by mimicking a bird's natural environment. Breeder aviaries, exotic bird collections and poultry production farms were some of the original places that full spectrum lighting was used and observed to demonstrate a definite positive effect.

One of the greatest benefits of our full spectrum light for birds is the natural synthesis of Vitamin D precursors allowing the animal to naturally regulate calcium uptake.

Another important benefit of full spectrum lighting is the effect it has on the glandular system; the Thyroid Gland controls how and when the other glands function and for it to function properly, it needs to be stimulated by normal photo periods of full-spectrum light. The Hypothalamus is involved in proper feather development and skin. The Pineal Gland controls the cyclical processes such as molting and the reproductive cycle.

Birds have four-color vision and the lower wavelength ultraviolet (UVA) adds the fourth visual perspective. Correct spectrum and photo period of light are also critical factors in normal preening as well as the skin and feather health of birds. If a bird's system is not stimulated through adequate environmental lighting to maintain proper endocrine function, it may become lethargic and not continue normal preening behaviors.

A full spectrum light for birds with a CRI (color rendering index) of 88 or higher contains enough UVA to achieve this. It is middle ultraviolet light (UVB) that causes Vitamin D synthesis in the skin. Most professionals agree that the UVB needs to be somewhere between 290 and 310 nanometers in wavelength and a color temperature of 5000 Kelvin for this to occur.

*Glass windows filter out up to 90% of the beneficial UV spectrum unless that glass was made pre 1939. Aluminum screening used can filter out 30% or more UV light. High-grade acrylic (cages) filters out less than 5% of the UV light.

Full spectrum light for birds can provide these important benefits.



Some Major Benefits

* Prepares bird for seasonal changes
* Encourages breeding behaviors
* Strengthens immune system
* Lowers obsessive/compulsive behavior frequencies
* Relieves psychological distress
* Mimics a bird's natural environment
* Aids in Vitamin D Synthesis
* Maintains constant environmental temperature
* Aids a bird's visual acuity
* Increases the longevity of the captive bird


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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-02-2014, 11:05 AM


 
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Hmmm, a CRI of 88 is way too low, birdkeepers now use a minimum of 93 (the closer to 100, the better). But you also have to take the Kelvin temperature into consideration because that's what gives the light it's predominant color with 5500 been the closest to sunlight and what is most desirable but it should never be higher than that as it makes a light too blue and brings them into breeding condition. Unfortunately for us (and he birds), we can't get the spectral distribution of commercial full spectrum lights and that's as important as the CRI and Ktemp.
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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 03:03 PM
 
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A parrotlet authority of whom I have no reason to doubt and all reason to trust (she literally wrote the book on companion parrotlets) has raised concern that full spectrum lighting can cause prolonged molting in the birds leading to undue physical stress.

Does anyone have experience with this, or have experience to the contrary?

My bird was exposed to a full spectrum bulb and her last molt was three months long (there certainly could have been many other factors involved in this, hence my open-mindedness on the topic (correlation does not imply causation, etc.)... Her new plumage is stunningly beautiful, I must say (as did her vet, unprompted)).

Any thoughts?

Last edited by Deresy; 03-04-2014 at 08:38 PM. Reason: Bonus bits
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post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-05-2014, 01:57 PM


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deresy View Post
A parrotlet authority of whom I have no reason to doubt and all reason to trust (she literally wrote the book on companion parrotlets) has raised concern that full spectrum lighting can cause prolonged molting in the birds leading to undue physical stress.

Does anyone have experience with this, or have experience to the contrary?

My bird was exposed to a full spectrum bulb and her last molt was three months long (there certainly could have been many other factors involved in this, hence my open-mindedness on the topic (correlation does not imply causation, etc.)... Her new plumage is stunningly beautiful, I must say (as did her vet, unprompted)).

Any thoughts?
My birds have had full spectrum lights for years and years and they all molt exactly when they are supposed to (at the end of the breeding season although, in the past few years, it seems to be starting a bit earlier which I assumed to be due to global warming) and never for more than 8 weeks so I would say that more information is required about this problem.

1. What are the specs on the full spectrum ?(full spectrum is just an industry marketing tool, there are no guidelines so specs have a VERY wide range and that makes a big difference)

2. How far from the birds is it located?

3. Are the birds on a strict solar schedule and, if not, what schedule? (some species of birds would go into molt at more than 15 hours of light)

4. Temperature of the room? (some species go into molt at more than a constant 85 degrees)

5. Diet? (high protein will cause a long and hard molt -even soft molt!)
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post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-05-2014, 05:57 PM
 
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Of course, correlation does not imply causation. Trying to find certainty within multiple variables is a fool's errand and a path to insanity.

I was simply wondering if anyone had a response to a parrotlet expert advising to refrain from using full spectrum bulbs as she apparently has evidence that the therapy results in prolonged molting in parrotlets.

I suppose the response is: 'No, she is wrong.' Alright, good to know. As always, when it comes to the internet, it is best to take all unsourced information with boulder-sized grains of salt.

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post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-06-2014, 02:08 PM


 
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When I am in doubt, I always go to nature. Birds are exposed to the 'real' full spectrum of the sun every single day of their lives and the wild ones always molt when they are supposed to so it stands to reason that if her indoor birds molt too much there has to be something else that is causing it - now, whether this is from a full spectrum source that doesn't have 'good' specs or something else, we can't know because we simply don't have all the info.
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post #19 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-11-2014, 04:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tippa View Post
I have 2 UV lights and I rotate them between the birds daily. I have 10 birds in six cages.


The Importance of Ultra Violet Light in Birds - YouTube




This type of UV lamp is probably more ideal for you, it's easier for you to rotate this type between cages.
Here's a copy of her YOuTube in the written words: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites...let-light.aspx
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