Macaw advice? - Talk Parrots Forums

Large Parrots Discuss specific (larger) species in this forum: Mini-macaws, macaws, African greys, amazons, cockatoos, etc.

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-15-2013, 12:06 AM Thread Starter
 
Korvia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Campbell River, BC
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Macaw advice?

I'm hopefully getting a scarlet macaw, I was wondering what can I do to make the move easier on him/her? is there away to stop nipping if s/he nips? any other general advice? I have a cockatiel now and conures (they live up at my moms) I know they would have to have separate out of cage time. is it harder for older macaws to get used to new people? I've done alot of looking up on the internet but it's too general the information. What are the pros and cons of them?

Korvia is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-15-2013, 02:12 AM


 
aether-drifter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Age: 34
Posts: 328
Thanks: 202
Thanked 226 Times in 124 Posts
Rep Power: 9
   
Honestly....I would think long and very hard about taking on the responsibility of a big macaw. I don't have any advice as I don't have one, but I just don't think it's something you should rush into. What happens if it doesn't work out or if the bird is too challenging? Will it end up rehomed again in a month? What kind of situation is the bird coming from anyway?
Sorry to be a killjoy.

Last edited by aether-drifter; 02-15-2013 at 02:15 AM.
aether-drifter is offline  
post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-15-2013, 02:56 AM



 
catalinadee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 17,637
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 2,007 Times in 1,575 Posts
Rep Power: 99
                     
The cons of a macaw:

Macaws screaming - YouTube - turn that up as loud as you can then and then imagine it x10

Scarlet macaws, though they shouldn't be generalized, are known to be the most aggressive macaw species once they hit maturity. Most people cannot go anywhere near them due to their 'nipping'. Keep in mind a macaws bite ends up a little something like this... http://www.macaws-forsale.com/files/...8991705ff5.JPG

If your birds currently do not live with you now, and I won't ask why, then do you realistically have the time for an older macaw who is going to need working on? I ask this because before I take on birds I have to think about what is going to happen in the future and because of my birds I have had to leave a lot. My family intend on moving from the UK to Florida however because it is SO difficult for me to move the birds and I'd have to go and become an apprentice falconer to keep my current raptors I am not willing to do it. A macaw would take up all of your time. I recently kept two Hahn's macaws for a friend and they're extremely demanding, regardless of being very, very small! They're also extremely loud. If you hear a Hahn's macaw scream in person you can only imagine how loud a larger macaw can actually get! And could those little things pack a punch when they'd had enough of you. You will be literally planning your life around that bird, so please keep that in mind. Think of it as like having a kid (or another kid... I don't remember if you have said before!) who your neighbours will get you thrown out for if that kid got too loud. Like a teenager playing really loud music all the time

A macaw can and will destroy everything it touches they have one BIG beak and that big beak will have a great time wrecking your walls!

Another thing is, yet again about the beak, if one of your smaller birds was to land on that cage they don't have a good chance of coming back off it the same way they went on. I was reading before elsewhere that someone's green cheek conure had landed on the cage of a scarlet macaw (I'm positive it was a scarlet) and the poor person heard a loud crunch. With the tiniest touch that conures beak was shattered. A scarlet macaw can kill your birds with the blink of an eye if you're not careful and nobody wants that to happen to you!

The pros of a macaw:

You could have an extremely loving, gentle, quiet scarlet macaw who you're going to have no trouble with what so ever!


To make the move easier I highly recommend that once s/he gets there that you put him/her straight into the cage with food and water and a couple of toys and perches (not too many yet you don't want to spook them) and leave them for the next day. For about a week just go in to change food and water. After that start staying in there after you have done these things. Just sit there and talk but don't make too much eye contact. Once the bird doesn't back up when you walk into the room, try handing him/her a nice treat. Although I haven't tried a training diet yet, I do recommend you watch this video because you could find it extremely helpful How To Set Up Your Parrot's Training Diet - YouTube I have found that trick training with birds who aren't hand tame and working with them to become hand tame can be very rewarding and fun! Get a clicker and target, you'll have a new best friend just from doing some basic tricks like touch training this should help with the nipping anyways. Always respect your birds space though!

I can imagine that an older macaw can bond with anybody at any point BUT the things affecting these birds is it's past. Do you know anything about it's previous experiences with people? An abused and neglected bird will be most likely very fearful and so fear may look like aggression to somebody who doesn't know how to read a macaw

I'm sorry for being another to rain on the parade but you need to know this stuff waaaaaaay before even considering a macaw because nobody wants you to have to rehome the bird in the future because of the most common reasons. We don't want you or the bird being upset

Let us know what you decide though! Either way we'll support the decision

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
catalinadee is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to catalinadee For This Useful Post:
aether-drifter (02-15-2013), Oni (02-15-2013)
 
post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-15-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Big_bird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 541
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 11
     
Send a message via Skype™ to Big_bird
I had a Severe Macaw, and I can tell you with absolute certainty, they are NOT for the everyday person. I know its not the same species, but Macaws in general love to test boundaries ALLL THHHEEE TIIMMEEE. KC constantly bluffed at us, at the age of 6.

Also, prepare to be bitten. HARD. Just a fact of life with a big parrot.

Also prepare for the noise, macaws LOVE to scream as a method of communication, again, just who they are.



A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.
- Lou Holtz


Big_bird is offline  
post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-15-2013, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
 
Korvia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Campbell River, BC
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
The conures don't live with me at the moment, because they are breeding and my dad is the breeder of the family. I know I can't let them out at the same time. Noise is not a problem, I've done a lot of reading up and think I can handle it. I do know I will be his 3rd owner, he has out lived his past two. My dad also said he would help with training and would take him on if he turns out to be too much. But I am confidant I can handle it.

Korvia is offline  
post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-15-2013, 07:59 PM


 
aether-drifter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Age: 34
Posts: 328
Thanks: 202
Thanked 226 Times in 124 Posts
Rep Power: 9
   
Have you met him yet? Do you know his current owners at all, or is he on Craigslist or something? Just asking because a lot of times people are not truthful about behavioral issues when trying to rehome a bird...they may conveniently forget to leave out a few details.
I think you should try to spend a little time with him first before making a decision.
I just know a bird like this takes a LOT of energy, commitment and will test the limits of your patience. Will you still have time for your other birds if you get him? What about having a life? And future life plans?
I just got a medium-sized bird and he's already proving to be much more of a challenge them my littles even though I feel pretty optimistic about being able to work through it. You can read a lot of behavior books and sites and still, when you're dealing with issues yourself it's harder to apply them than you might have thought. At least that's been the case for me, trying to discourage my cockatoo's play biting.

Sorry if my previous reply came off as rude, I just don't think most people in general could handle a macaw. I probably couldn't -- their screams drive me crazy, their beaks intimidate me, and I'm not a big fan of the "bluffing" and constantly testing limits personality traits. Then again, I know they can be amazing companions if you're 100% dedicated to them. I would hate to see this bird be passed along to yet another home if yours doesn't work out, even if he's staying in the family. He's already had three homes, he needs a permanent one now.

Last edited by aether-drifter; 02-15-2013 at 08:03 PM.
aether-drifter is offline  
post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-15-2013, 10:29 PM Thread Starter
 
Korvia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Campbell River, BC
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonchild View Post
Have you met him yet? Do you know his current owners at all, or is he on Craigslist or something? Just asking because a lot of times people are not truthful about behavioral issues when trying to rehome a bird...they may conveniently forget to leave out a few details.
I think you should try to spend a little time with him first before making a decision.
I just know a bird like this takes a LOT of energy, commitment and will test the limits of your patience. Will you still have time for your other birds if you get him? What about having a life? And future life plans?
I just got a medium-sized bird and he's already proving to be much more of a challenge them my littles even though I feel pretty optimistic about being able to work through it. You can read a lot of behavior books and sites and still, when you're dealing with issues yourself it's harder to apply them than you might have thought. At least that's been the case for me, trying to discourage my cockatoo's play biting.

Sorry if my previous reply came off as rude, I just don't think most people in general could handle a macaw. I probably couldn't -- their screams drive me crazy, their beaks intimidate me, and I'm not a big fan of the "bluffing" and constantly testing limits personality traits. Then again, I know they can be amazing companions if you're 100% dedicated to them. I would hate to see this bird be passed along to yet another home if yours doesn't work out, even if he's staying in the family. He's already had three homes, he needs a permanent one now.
I'm unable to work due to medical problems, so really I have all the time in the word. As for a social life medical problems ruin that as well so it's fine. I don't think you were being rude, I understand were you are coming from. I will be able to visit him before deciding and I know the family that owns him. Not too sure if he's a green wing or a scarlet, the son who I know really well was describing him to me, he sounds like a scarlet but I could be wrong. I'm not afraid of getting bit,for some reason. I'm willing to put in the time for him. I will always have time for my other birds.

Korvia is offline  
post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 04:35 AM
 
Big_bird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 541
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 11
     
Send a message via Skype™ to Big_bird
You think you can handle it now, trust me.. When I first got KC, I was thinking the same thing, oh I will be able to handle it, surely it won't be THAT loud... FYI, KC I could hear down the block, and she was only a mini macaw... Do you have neighbours? A macaw could get you the least favourite person in the neighbourhood title really quickly...

By the way, you might want to know the difference between a Scarlet and a green wing, Scarlets have been known to be NOTORIOUSLY (and I mean that, I really do) bitey, severely one personed, and downright aggressive. That's not saying another birds could not be as well, but a green wing by comparison is like black and white. Green wings are more laid back, more willing to accept new things (AGAIN not saying it is not possible, but unlikely a scarlet will be this way)

I'm not trying to turn you off of Macaws, but until I had KC did I really know what I was getting into. You think you can handle it trust me, but NOTHING can prepare you, no matter how much reading for what these birds are really like. You can read a bird is loud, but like I said, KC I can and still can hear down the block... And like I said, she's only a mini macaw, imagine how loud these big guys can get.



A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.
- Lou Holtz


Big_bird is offline  
post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 04:53 AM
 
Big_bird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 541
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 11
     
Send a message via Skype™ to Big_bird
Here's some videos: Carl, with Carmen and Maria, rescued green wings, notice how one minute they go from being playful, to a bluff lunge. Carmen and Maria want to help Carl! - YouTube
KC was practicing step up with me after a bath outside in her solarium, if you notice my voice changed to scolding, she was attempting to bluff my hand. Second time I scolded her was her trying to push her boundaries by going up my shoulder. A large bird like a macaw should NEVER be allowed on your shoulder, its a sign of dominance, and they can rip (and I;ve seen a rescued parrot do this) your ear in half. KC wants up! - YouTube
Also, you notice how the lovely KC does not have many chest feathers. I was KC's 3 possibly 4th home in her short 6 year life, and she was severely neglected. Many of these big parrots people think they can handle, and they just cannot. KC came from a hoarder with TWENTY SEVEN large parrots.

This is KC the day we got her: notice how dingy her feathers are, and how split her tail is. She was smoked around, and then tossed in a COCKATIEL cage, and PADLOCKED in her cage.

KC shredding her paper towel - YouTube



A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.
- Lou Holtz


Big_bird is offline  
post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 05:10 AM
 
Big_bird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 541
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 11
     
Send a message via Skype™ to Big_bird
As Daisy mentioned, Macaws can also cause serious damage to little birds. KC was NEVER allowed to socialize with my linnies.

With that being said, I'd like you to meet a very special little lady.
Again, not trying to scare you from them, a Macaw's bond can be very rewarding once you have worked your lives around each other. I would not have changed my time with KC for anything, but I think you should also hear Hominy's story.

Hominy is a beautiful little lutino Indian Ringneck parakeet. Hominy, is th tragic victim, of a split second encounter with a Blue and Gold Macaw. The Macaw sheared the top mandible of her beak right off her face, as well as left a large wound on her head, and bite marks to her small feet.

Hominy made it out with her life luckily, and is slowly starting to mend.

http://greyhaven.bc.ca/urgent-hominy/hominy-gallery

BUT
what I'm trying to point out, it only takes a split second for the damage to be done.

Macaws as I said can be wonderful companions, but not everyone can love a macaw. I, Jenny, Daisy, and everyone else with macaws here know of what I speak, Macaws are not for everyone, but when the chemistry is right, its magic.

I'm not trying to make Macaws out to be like Jaws, just make you aware of the VERY REAL risks to owning one of these sometimes challenging birds.



A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.
- Lou Holtz


Big_bird is offline  
post #11 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 07:24 AM
 
Wingz4Thingz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: England
Age: 22
Posts: 358
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
It's not fair to generalise all scarlet macaws as aggressive as there can be some very sweet scarlet macaws who are gentle and rarely bite. Most of the time the reason for this nippy behaviour is because they were weaned too soon or they were not properly socialized. Do consider whether you have all the time money and space necessary for a large macaw. I'm not judging you, because I don't know you, but only YOU will know if you can handle a macaw. Think about where you will be in 60-80 years. Realistically, most macaws don't live over 100. 60 or 80 is the average age. This is a huge commitment and you're taking on a big responsablity, but I'm sure you already knew that.
Now as for your question about making the move less stressful for him/her, you could take him in a travel cage in your car with something from his old home - our sennie still has his old cuddly duck toy from his old home! To prevent nipping well, all parrots will bite at some point so you need to be prepared. Brush up on your macaw body language before you get one and look for the signs of aggression (however some parrots do cheat and will bite without provocation ) Sometimes my sennie will trick me by putting his head down for a scratch and then biting really hard. He often draws blood. Think about the damage a macaw can do. Also think about the noise. Anyway where was I before I so rudely interrupted myself? Oh yes, young parrots will also use their beaks a lot to explore. This is called beaking. If the beaking gets too rough say "gently" or something. Also, be prepared for your macaws' behaviour to turn aggressive once it hits maturity. If your bird bites you, try not to overreact or pull your finger away. This is the expected result. Instead, use wobble correction if the bird is on your hand or arm by wobbling your arm gently. The bird will lose balance and release its beak to steady itself. You can also lower it down if it is biting. They don't like being lower than their flockmates. And look them in the eye, they will usually stop biting down. If all else fails, then push your finger in to its beak. It's kind of the opposite of what you want to do, because your natural response is to pull away when you feel the pain, but if you push your finger in towards the parrots beak when it's biting (try not to do it too hard) this is the unexpected response so the parrot will usually release its hold. Hope I helped somewhat.
Wingz4Thingz is offline  
post #12 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 07:43 AM



 
catalinadee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 17,637
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 2,007 Times in 1,575 Posts
Rep Power: 99
                     
Macaw advice?

Actually I don't recommend doing any of those things when a macaw is biting purely because they're going to get even more annoyed. Unless you have already had macaw experience I wouldn't even attempt to do those things. It would push YOUR boundaries in respecting their space. The best thing to do not to get bitten is respect their space. If its not a bird who can be handled, use touch training

I also stated above that scarlet macaws shouldn't be generalised but it's the same with any bird of any kind. They all have something that puts people off. 99% of green cheeks go through a nipping phase in my opinion. Lories can snap at the drop of a hat, cockatoos are screamers. I have birds that don't fit into these descriptions but most people do. It is a well known fact that military macaws and scarlet macaws are the 'meaner' macaw species. It isn't related to their socialisation or being weaned too early, in some cases it may be but it's not necessary. They can and will bite. You have to expect bites. It's part of keeping birds. When a macaw hits maturity boy are you in for a ride! But that's part of having macaws

Macaws are big bluffers too!

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
catalinadee is offline  
post #13 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 12:54 PM Thread Starter
 
Korvia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Campbell River, BC
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
It's not set in stone that I am getting him. But I know to prepare for the worst if that's the case. I know it's not the same but my cockatiel bluffs me all the time asks for scratches and bites. As for space I have lots, I know that macaws are for life. The lady that has him right now is getting too old to care for him properly. He's coming with a 7 foot cage. Now to try to prevent cookie from getting hurt, here is my idea, let me know if it's not going to work, I was thinking of covering all but the front of the cage,so the macaw can see out but not get at cookie or cookie moves to another room and only comes out to the front room when supervised. Trying to make it work so cookie doesn't have to be moved to another room.
Noise is not an issue, I talked to my landlord and he said that's fine.

Korvia is offline  
post #14 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 12:59 PM



 
catalinadee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 17,637
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 2,007 Times in 1,575 Posts
Rep Power: 99
                     
I wouldn't cover the cages, it's not fair on either bird. What you can do is when your green cheek is out the macaws cage could be covered? Only at that point

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
catalinadee is offline  
post #15 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 01:07 PM Thread Starter
 
Korvia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Campbell River, BC
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by catalinadee View Post
I wouldn't cover the cages, it's not fair on either bird. What you can do is when your green cheek is out the macaws cage could be covered? Only at that point
That won't make him upset? The conures won't be home for a while,like I said they are breeding at my parents house, dad has the experience, to handle them if something goes wrong, I just wanted them for pets, but they had other ideas lol. Back on topic when the macaw comes out should I cover the tiel's cage? I want to minimize the possibility of my tiel getting hurt and still be fair to the macaw. I really am glad you guys are telling me the cons to them too, helps me prepare if he comes to live with me.

Korvia is offline  
post #16 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 01:20 PM



 
catalinadee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 17,637
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 2,007 Times in 1,575 Posts
Rep Power: 99
                     
I would cover the tiels cage when he's out purely because if the macaw lands on the cage and the tiel is on the bars it would lead to a horrendous accident

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
catalinadee is offline  
post #17 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 03:06 PM
 
Big_bird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 541
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 11
     
Send a message via Skype™ to Big_bird
I didn't say it wasn't possible to have a nice macaw, because it is, it really is, but what I was saying, is be very careful. Scarlets and Military macaws are classifieds as meaner macaws, but so are Severes, like my KC. It is all dependent on the bird that is true.

Hannah, I should point out, you should NOT do the wobble thing with a macaw, and here's why. KC when she felt insecure on my arm at any point, she would do her favourite behaviour to test you. She would whip her beak down lightening fast, and hold you fingers in her beak. She wouldn't apply pressure until you moved. If you tried to dislodge her by wobbling, she would try to pinch you as hard as she could. It was a warning basically stating I'm uncomfortable, stop.

You rent?? Now I'm really worried. Has your landlord ever heard one of these birds? And what is your living situation? Is it a house or an apartment? Also does the landlord live with you? Like above you in the house?

Reason I ask, because Macaws like all birds have a period of excited screaming in the morning, and at night. Its normal because they are communicating with their flock when they wake up, and when they are going to roost for the night. And when I say morning, it could be very early.



A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.
- Lou Holtz


Big_bird is offline  
post #18 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
 
Korvia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Campbell River, BC
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
My landlord lives in the building, he's not worried about noise there is a bunch of dogs in the building and close to a middle school. Noise is not a problem. I know you are not saying that macaws are all mean, it's just more generalized that they are mean. Like I said the info I was reading online was too general, didn't say they were mean or nice. Were as if I ask you guys who have had one before you can give me more insight. as said you thought you could handle them till you got them, that maybe true for me but I don't know til I try it out right? again it's not set in stone, it's up to the lady who has him now if she will let me have him. I know it'll be a challenge and I honestly am looking foreword to it. so I know he is at lest 20, does age make it harder for them to adjust? I want to make him as happy as I can.

Korvia is offline  
post #19 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 04:38 PM


 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 562
Thanks: 5
Thanked 72 Times in 59 Posts
Rep Power: 14
           
I have worked around different Macaw species and have two Hahns myself.

I have a friend whose family has kept Macaws all his life, his parents before he was even born, he has a Scarlet now and that bird was raised correctly, properly weaned and socialised and was the loveliest bird. Then it hit maturity and is totally unhand-able. It will attack anyone who goes near it including other birds. These birds do serious damage!!
The last two I worked with were a blue and gold and greenwing, these were not birds to be messed with, were fine with me outside the enclosure and even took food from me no bother, but boy did you have to watch your back when you went in with them, some days they were totally fine, others they had me cornered and I have even been dive bombed by them, you literally had to have eyes in the back of your head.
These birds are nothing like a conure or cockatiel, or even other larger parrot species.

If you want to get a real feel for them do some voluntary work around them, help out in rescues and ask this lady if you can visit the bird every day for a month or so before deciding if it is the right bird for you.

Honestly you won't get a true feel for them unless you spend a lot of time around them, these birds may seem very sweet and loving with their human or around their human but once out their comfort zone it can change, you may also notice a change once the bird starts to get used to you, either bonding with you or becoming more bold and aggressive.

Every bird is different as every situation is different but Macaws are really a bird for an owner experienced in larger parrots.

I would also be wary about taking one on in rented accommodation, these birds can really make some noise, I could hear the ones I worked with across the other end of the gardens, they don't just scream in the mornings and at night either, if they get spooked they scream, if they want attention they scream, if they are upset they scream, if they are happy they scream, if they want to locate you they scream. They are nothing like dogs barking or children making noise.

It doesn't matter how bad you feel, or how tired you are, how painful that headache is, if they want to they are going to scream and there is little you can do about it lol.

Personally I would not even have your current birds in the same room at any point with the Mac if you get one. There is no point in even risking it, it only takes a second for disaster to strike and you will always regret it and feel guilty, not worth the risk.

These birds are also very long lived, I know of one that reached 127, you need a plan in place for the bird should you get to the point you can no longer care for it.

They are also very destructive, and require a lot of time and money, vets bills can easily get very expensive, the toys they get through and the cost of the toys soon adds up, not to mention the cost of the food.

But honestly the best advice is to spend as much time around them as possible especially any you think of taking on, I am talking months not days, you need to get a real feel for the bird on good days and bad days.
CaptainHowdy is offline  
post #20 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-16-2013, 04:44 PM
 
Luthien's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Canada
Age: 32
Posts: 88
Thanks: 2
Thanked 30 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Send a message via Yahoo to Luthien Send a message via Skype™ to Luthien
Scarlet Macaw's are beautiful and wonderful pets, but as has already been mentioned they can be loud, needy, messy and they need plenty of human cuddle time.

My Scarlet is 7 months old and I wouldn't trade him for the world, he isn't that loud but does scream now and then (others aren't so lucky as that) but wants me around constantly.

Do your research first and make sure you have the time, money, patience, and good neighbors for a Scarlet Macaw.
Luthien is offline  
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Talk Parrots Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome