Feeding Shell Grit To Your Lovebird. - Talk Parrots Forums

Parrot Nutrition, Diet and Feeding Discuss parrot nutrition, diets, foods and feeding.

 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-11-2014, 09:53 PM Thread Starter
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Feeding Shell Grit To Your Lovebird.

Does anyone feed, or offer shell grit to their lovebirds to help aid the digestion of seeds?

I read the following on the The African Lovebird and Foreign Parrot Society Of Queensland's website http://alsq.org.au/


Grit

This is a vital ingredient in a Lovebird's diet. When food is swallowed it enters the crop and can be stored before passing through into the gizzard. Here the grit assists digestion by grinding up the seed and stopping food sticking together. There are a few types available, so ask at the pet or produce store for assistance. A medium size shell grit is recommended.

I know that budgie "experts" frown on offering budgies grit.


Cheers,

John.
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 08:15 AM



 
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I personally do not offer grit. Most grits and sands are insoluble and unfortunately they are still on the bird market. People think they're buying a useful product for their birds and down the line when the bird drops dead they don't know what happened. The grit can build up and cause crop impaction. Now oyster shell grit is soluble but I still choose not to use it. I don't use it because psittacines hull their seeds and don't need to grind off the husk. My doves however do have oyster shell as they don't hull their seeds. By all means you can offer it to any of your birds, as long as it is oyster shell, but I would rather not myself. A recent necropsy came back to me for my orange winged Amazon and he had been fed grit over the last few years and his crop was absolutely full of it. I'd had him for most of last year and not fed him a single bit. Goes to show how it really does stay in there

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 01:24 PM


 
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Daisy is correct. I once read that it might take up to a year for the first symptom to appear. Once the stuff is there, it can't come out. I don't know where the information about the lovebirds came from but it's dated, nobody feeds grit to their parrots any longer.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 01:26 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your advice Daisy & Bibi, it certainly makes sense and bears much more investigation by me before deciding one way or the other.

Cheers,

John.

Last edited by Uno; 01-12-2014 at 01:38 PM.
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-19-2014, 03:13 PM
 
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I don't offer my budgies grit for the reasons previously listed, but my lovie enjoys playing in the grit and doesn't eat it so I occasionally put of a tray of oyster shell grit for him to throw around.

Nala , Chip , and Kuzco
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-19-2014, 03:17 PM
 
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I wouldn't, basically because of what Daisy said.




DIGBY 4-year-old male Congo African Grey
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-19-2014, 05:09 PM


 
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I only offer oyster shell when I have a laying hen.. It is high in calcium.. Other than that I do not offer it.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-20-2014, 10:03 PM


 
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Only non hook beak Fids need grit. Finch and the like.
Hook beaks break the case off their seeds before eating them, so do need grit in the crop to grind up the seed.

But I would add that this is another subject where the word can mean many things.
Grit to me is a hard substance and does not wear down very easy.
And will build up in the crop.
Shell is a soft substance and is digestible, so should not cause any problems.
And is rich in calcium.
I did get into a ----fight over this very subject on another forum.


A tribute to my lost ones. RIP.

Last edited by clawnz; 04-20-2014 at 10:05 PM.
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