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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 07:29 PM Thread Starter


 
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So when does the 'puberty' period end?

Oops the title was supposed to say puberty period end. Anyway, so when will the puberty period end and a lineolated parakeet actually be an adult? Mina is 6mths old.

Dying to know, lol

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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 08:30 AM



 
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Probably give it a couple more months With some individuals (or Amazons haha) you get birds who have a hormonal patch every year, so even if she does calm down soon come breeding season you may have similar problems

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 09:51 AM
 
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Hang in there! Louie is 10 months old and his Dr. Heckle days are starting to outnumber his Mr. Hyde days, so it looks like there is a light at the end of the tunnel!


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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 10:10 AM


 
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It all depends on the individual bird (genetics), the gender (males been worse than females), the species, (whether they are naturally 'more' hormonal than others), the diet (birds fed soy get an early sexual maturation), and the light schedule you keep them at (if you keep them at a spring light schedule all the time, the 'terrible' puberty lasts longer).
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 11:43 AM Thread Starter


 
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10 months old! Ok, 4 more months, lol. I appreciate everyone's feedback. Right now she gets a lot of veggies and healthy grains, with the occasional fruit. She is also being offered a mixture of about 25% Roudybush pellets and 75% parakeet seed (with flax, rape, niger, and alfalfa seeds in addition to the traditional seeds in parakeet seed mixes). I also just ordered a seed sprouting kit and a lil' bird seed sprouting mix from the sprout people, so I will start giving her those probably within the next or so. She gets covered on weeknights 8:30 and uncovered at about 6:30, but she is usually already awake. On weekends, I do not cover her but she goes to bed about the same time and then wakes up when she wakes up.

@ Petiteoiseau, you mentioned that some species are naturally more hormonal than others. Are linnies one of those species? What are those species, just out of curiosity?
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 01:39 PM


 
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Linnies will be adults at the age of about 10-12 months.
But why do you ask? Is Mina's puberty so bad?
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 02:01 PM Thread Starter


 
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I wouldn't say it is so so so bad. But she has never bitten me before this week and hasn't ever done too many things "wrong", so it makes it more noticeable. And then there was the humping that one day a few weeks ago. That has not happened again since I removed that toy. But this week has been a bad week for Mina (and me ) due to the biting (which never happened before), her not wanting me to touch her, and her just being a little reclusive.

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 02:23 PM


 
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Don't be sad, 4thebirds!
I've had biting issues with Paulchen for several weeks now. The last two days it has become better.
I went back to organic seeds. The last seed mixture had too many supplements and especially proteins which encourage the bird's body to build hormons.
I think that caused his strong aggressions.

The puberty is indeed more hard for birds who don't have a partner of their species.
During the puberty creatures build their identity by identification, example and distancing themselves. Mina must do that without another linnie.
So you are the one to help her through and educate her not to bite.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 02:58 PM Thread Starter


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flapping Mama View Post
Don't be sad, 4thebirds!
I've had biting issues with Paulchen for several weeks now. The last two days it has become better.
I went back to organic seeds. The last seed mixture had too many supplements and especially proteins which encourage the bird's body to build hormons.
I think that caused his strong aggressions.

The puberty is indeed more hard for birds who don't have a partner of their species.
During the puberty creatures build their identity by identification, example and distancing themselves. Mina must do that without another linnie.
So you are the one to help her through and educate her not to bite.
hummm....I wonder about the additives. I try to get the seeds with the least additives, but it does say fortified.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 03:36 PM


 
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This is more a problem with pet birds over breeder birds. Because pet birds tend to be pampered much more than a breeder will pamper their birds they are consistently being fed a diet too high in protein and being kept in artificial light for much longer hours than birds kept in aviaries.

My breeder birds are outside and get a very basic diet until a few weeks before breeding cycle is due to start, then their diet is boosted with extra goodies.
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 04:03 PM Thread Starter


 
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Quote:
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This is more a problem with pet birds over breeder birds. Because pet birds tend to be pampered much more than a breeder will pamper their birds they are consistently being fed a diet too high in protein and being kept in artificial light for much longer hours than birds kept in aviaries.

My breeder birds are outside and get a very basic diet until a few weeks before breeding cycle is due to start, then their diet is boosted with extra goodies.
I can see your point. I don't give my birds any additional protein aside from what they get in their seeds and pellets. All of their mashes are veggies, with a small amount of fruit and grains. Also, my birds are in their own room at night so they aren't as effected by us staying up later like they would be if they were in the main room. Right now they are getting 10 hours of darkness on weekdays. It is hard to put them to bed earlier since I don't get home until 6pm.

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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-15-2014, 12:21 AM
 
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Turk wasn't too bad. He hit a year at Xmas/Newyears. Dobby won't be a year til May. He's no too bad any more either.

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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 09:32 AM


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4thebirds View Post
@ Petiteoiseau, you mentioned that some species are naturally more hormonal than others. Are linnies one of those species? What are those species, just out of curiosity?
The highly hormonal species are the ones that are either very opportunistic (give them rich food, something that resembles a nest and they will breed even with long nights/short days), the ones that have a very long breeding season in the wild (like ekkies) or the ones that have more than one breeding season (like cockatoos that breed both in spring and fall). People talk about amazons and quakers been highly hormonal but, in reality, they are not, they just need to be kept at a strict solar schedule because quakers and some zons are from temperate zones.

I've never had linnies so I have no personal experience with them but, for what I've read about them and learned from people I know, in Colombia (I have no reference from the other countries they are from), the wild ones breed in July and August and this is right after the rains so I assume they are (like tiels, lovies, budgies, plets) highly opportunistic.

By the way, my Colombian friend says that males are mature at about 10 months of age but that hens take a bit longer at 12 or 14 months.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 11:36 AM Thread Starter


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by petiteoiseau View Post
The highly hormonal species are the ones that are either very opportunistic (give them rich food, something that resembles a nest and they will breed even with long nights/short days), the ones that have a very long breeding season in the wild (like ekkies) or the ones that have more than one breeding season (like cockatoos that breed both in spring and fall). People talk about amazons and quakers been highly hormonal but, in reality, they are not, they just need to be kept at a strict solar schedule because quakers and some zons are from temperate zones.

I've never had linnies so I have no personal experience with them but, for what I've read about them and learned from people I know, in Colombia (I have no reference from the other countries they are from), the wild ones breed in July and August and this is right after the rains so I assume they are (like tiels, lovies, budgies, plets) highly opportunistic.

By the way, my Colombian friend says that males are mature at about 10 months of age but that hens take a bit longer at 12 or 14 months.
Thank you that was helpful.

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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 02:19 PM


 
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Bibi in the wild budgies are opportunistic breeders. As soon as there are rains they will breed regardless of the time of the year.

With the Australian Cockatoo's they are late winter early spring. Some will have their babies hatch around the beginning of September which is the start of Spring here. If they breed early like this they may have a second clutch if it is a particularly good season. But most of them if they are going to breed that year will have their babies sometime in October. But they don't double clutch unless it is a particularly good season.

For example 2013/14 has been particularly bad and the local Galah's have only just weaned babies this week as I could hear them feeding their fledged baby last week.
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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 11:03 AM


 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kate View Post
Bibi in the wild budgies are opportunistic breeders. As soon as there are rains they will breed regardless of the time of the year.

With the Australian Cockatoo's they are late winter early spring. Some will have their babies hatch around the beginning of September which is the start of Spring here. If they breed early like this they may have a second clutch if it is a particularly good season. But most of them if they are going to breed that year will have their babies sometime in October. But they don't double clutch unless it is a particularly good season.

For example 2013/14 has been particularly bad and the local Galah's have only just weaned babies this week as I could hear them feeding their fledged baby last week.
Exactly. Opportunistic breeders are breeders which primary trigger is food availability so, if there is enough food, they will breed, if there isn't, they will not. Which works great in the wild but, in captivity, this makes them the 'hormonal species' because there is always plenty of high protein food so they tend to produce sexual hormones longer or more often than the 'non-hormonal' species. This is why people used to believe that these species bred all year round (and some people would still argue that this is OK to do).
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