Training Experts I need help - Talk Parrots Forums

Parrot Behavior, Bonding and Training Discuss parrot behavior, parrot training, parrot bonding, and other psychological aspects of parrot care.

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-08-2014, 03:39 PM Thread Starter
 
Julie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 183
Thanks: 11
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Send a message via Yahoo to Julie
Training Experts I need help

Hi,

I want to be able to get my parrotlets out of their cage without being bitten. I don't want to use a net or glove, what can I do? I want to take each one separately into another room to train them. But getting them in and out of cage is difficult like I said without gloves or a net.

I tried the positive reinforcement method they will not step up onto a perch or my hand. As soon as I stick my hand in they attack.

I have target trained them in cage which works fine, until I head towards the door. They won't cooperate.

Julie
Julie is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 07:02 AM
 
Sunnyvmx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: In the Lake Chapala area south of Guadalajara MX.
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Send a message via Skype™ to Sunnyvmx
I'm not familiar with parrotlets, but I have seven cockatiels and two are new. These are at least four years old and never hand tamed. They hiss at me when I come near the cage. Understand that your bird's reactions are all based on fear and that's what you must alleviate. I start with a piece of millet in their food dish. When they have eaten it, it then becomes a favorite treat and I use it for taming. You will never alleviate the fear if you are causing it so take very small steps and back off if necessary until the next time. I like taming two birds at the same time because the competition seems to make it faster and easier. Once the millet is eaten from the food cup, then I stick it between the cage bars and sit back. Then when that's working, I open the door and offer it between my fingers. When they are eagerly going for the millet, I put it standing up between two fingers so they have to reach over a finger for the treat. Then put it between your third and fourth fingers so they have to actually step on a finger to reach the millet. I then pinch it with my thumb on an open palm and they have to sit on my hand to eat. Now you are on your way. You can hold your hand outside the door to coax them out. Give the birds time to do each of these steps well before going to the next. Remember, you are trying to gain their trust and this comes as the fear deminishes.

Last edited by Sunnyvmx; 05-09-2014 at 07:06 AM.
Sunnyvmx is offline  
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Sunnyvmx For This Useful Post:
4thebirds (05-09-2014), euphrosyne (06-16-2014), evefromtexas (05-12-2014), Ladybird (05-10-2014), wyrinth (05-10-2014)
post #3 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-09-2014, 01:05 PM


 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 462
Thanks: 133
Thanked 222 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 7
   
Have you used a net or gloves in the past? Because that would make them afraid of you and it will take quite some time to undo the damage. Also, when you say that target training inside the cage works, what do you mean by it? That they touch their beak to the stick? Because you can also train to perch on a stick inside the cage and that helps a lot with the small, flighty species like budgies and plets (tiels are much calmer than they are). My other suggestion is to let them out in the early evening without any artificial light on because they will go back into their cage on their own once dusk settles in to eat their dinner and roost. Once they get used to been out on their own and used to you (not afraid) and learn to step up to a stick inside the cage, you can start working on them outside the cage, too.
petiteoiseau is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to petiteoiseau For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014), Ladybird (05-10-2014)
 
post #4 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-10-2014, 10:23 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 86
Thanks: 0
Thanked 37 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by petiteoiseau View Post
Have you used a net or gloves in the past? Because that would make them afraid of you and it will take quite some time to undo the damage. Also, when you say that target training inside the cage works, what do you mean by it? That they touch their beak to the stick? Because you can also train to perch on a stick inside the cage and that helps a lot with the small, flighty species like budgies and plets (tiels are much calmer than they are). My other suggestion is to let them out in the early evening without any artificial light on because they will go back into their cage on their own once dusk settles in to eat their dinner and roost. Once they get used to been out on their own and used to you (not afraid) and learn to step up to a stick inside the cage, you can start working on them outside the cage, too.
She's netting them. I've given her suggestions, everyone on the P'let board has too. P'lets are very smart and aggressive as a species. You simply can't train one like you do other species. A lot of the same techniques will be used, but they have special needs that other birds don't. They need to be clipped and separated in order to force them to become dependent upon her and not each other. Once they are trained she can reunite them and let them molt out the clipped wings...until then though it's just going to get worse. Using a net isn't an option, neither is reaching into their cage and cupping them. They are scared, have no trust at all. Merely my opinion
M'éanín's Mommy is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to M'éanín's Mommy For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014)
post #5 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-10-2014, 04:12 PM


 
4thebirds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: California
Posts: 1,616
Thanks: 1,109
Thanked 903 Times in 591 Posts
Rep Power: 17
             
Parrotlets are very flighty, territorial birds with long memories. I don't find them that much more difficult to train than any other bird, but they do need a patient owner who can read their body language and change the situation to ensure a positive experience. This primarily (for plets) revolves around the owner socializing them and so therefore helping to minimize their fears and manage their territorial behavior. This is why a net is such a horrible thing for plets in particular. People never want to work with them with their hands for fear of getting bit, but the way I see it is we expect a 28 gram parrotlet to be brave enough to trust a huge human a million times their size, than we ourselves need to be brave enough to step up and risk a bite or two. I started the taming process with my untame, 2.5 year old, cage bound plet Oliver by gently scooping him out everyday for about a week (to teach him what 'step up' meant and to give him an idea that nothing bad would happen when he came out). After scooping him out, I then gave him tons of praise and millet and kept the space with just him and I and dim lights, and soft words. We worked on step up and he did well. He even let me scritch him within that first week. Once he knew what step up meant, after that we transitioned to stepping up on to a receiving blanket that was draped over my arm from inside the cage. I put millet near the crook of my arm and then once he stepped on for the millet, I backed my arm out of the cage. I did this with him for months. Now he will step up on my finger from the cage but I would have done the blanket thing forever if that was more comfortable for him. Because plets are so territorial, hands in their cage cause a lot of anxiety. Even for tame plets. So they have to be worked with on that. But they are great birds and not more difficult than lovebirds, small conures, etc. I don't like that they get such bad raps sometimes.

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." ~Anatole France
Owned by & slave to: Oliver, Gemma, Cozette, & the English Budgie Crew

Last edited by 4thebirds; 05-10-2014 at 04:20 PM.
4thebirds is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to 4thebirds For This Useful Post:
Ladybird (05-14-2014)
post #6 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-10-2014, 07:41 PM



 
catalinadee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 17,637
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 2,007 Times in 1,575 Posts
Rep Power: 99
                     
I personally do not believe that taking away flight from a frightful bird is the way to winning them over. You are taking away their only security, therefore, making them insecure. You can build a bond with a bird or you can dominate it, parrotlet or not. As long as a bird can fly, it has reassurance. That reassurance is what you use to build your bond with the bird

I think that the best thing for you to do is to separate them and target train. Train them to follow that target right out of the cage. Target them to step up on to you and then go and work in another room. It is easier said than done. Some birds may take days, some weeks, some months and some even longer than that but patience is what it's all about. As long as you can give them the time and patience they need, they will come around

All of the parrotlets I have had have been very skittish. They would fly back and forth like crazy whenever I would walk past their cage. I had absolutely no intention of them becoming companion animals as I wanted them to be left alone to breed, but over time they got less skittish and did not freak out as much when I would change their food and put their fresh stuff in

You can do it Chin up!

EDIT: Just wanted to say. I target train a bird to leave the cage following the target because it allows them to come out on their own terms. Not many birds like hands in the cage, and parrotlets can certainly be a bird who loves to attack an intruder! If you struggle to target train them out of the cage then just simply open the door until they find their own way out

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
catalinadee is offline  
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to catalinadee For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014), Ladybird (05-14-2014), wyrinth (05-10-2014)
post #7 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-11-2014, 09:21 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 86
Thanks: 0
Thanked 37 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by catalinadee View Post
I think that the best thing for you to do is to separate them

I had absolutely no intention of them becoming companion animals as I wanted them to be left alone to breed, but over time they got less skittish and did not freak out as much when I would change their food and put their fresh stuff in
Respect your opinion, completely agree with separation. I don't agree with the breeding comment though. They only have a few years of breeding compared to their lifespans (assuming you start around 1 yr and stop around age 5/6yo), once the breeder no longer has use for them they are typically sold to unsuspecting persons hoping to obtain a pet. Unfortunately by that point they either aren't trainable or are very difficult to train. They aren't good aviary birds, so your left without many options other than to keep them caged as a "looksie bird". Just my opinion though...I know it's common practice but it's not one I intend to take with my breeders. I still want them to be good companions.
M'éanín's Mommy is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to M'éanín's Mommy For This Useful Post:
4thebirds (05-11-2014)
post #8 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-12-2014, 10:51 AM


 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 462
Thanks: 133
Thanked 222 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 7
   
I disagree. Birds breed almost their entire lives if they are healthy. Breeders' birds don't because they are usually overbred and depleted. People usually tell you that canaries last between 7 and 9 years but all of mine live into their teens and I had a hen that lived to be 18 and had her last baby at 10 (an eggcident, actually, I set her up with an old male so I could use them as nurses -she was the best nurse I've ever had- and she laid one egg which I did not think could be fertile at her age but it was!).

I also don't believe in clipping, separating a bonded pair, taking the bird to an unfamiliar room or dimming lights for training, these are all forms of flooding. They work but they work for the wrong reasons and create a huge amount of stress in the process.

It is true that most breeders will get rid of their non-producing breeding pairs and it is also true that some of them don't tell the prospective buyers the truth, but some people don't mind having a bird that is not a pet or a companion. I certainly don't. I like them all and whether they like me back or not is irrelevant to me because it's always a temporary thing, anyway. My experience is the same as Daisy, aviary birds start been scared of us but, as time goes by and they realize we are no threat to them and that, quite the contrary, we are the bringer of food and water, they no longer fear us.

I purchased a breeding pair of Brazilian Red Crested cardinals recently and they were TERRIFIED of people. Every time anybody walked near their cage, they would freak out, banging themselves in their panic against the sides of the cage. Why? Because the previous owner netted them. Now, almost two weeks later, they still react negatively whenever I go into their cage to clean, feed, water but they no longer freak out the way they did before or when I am near (their cage is in front of the same window where I keep plants and I need to mist them twice a day) so we are making progress. And the day will come when I will be able to clean and feed without them reacting at all, just like I do my canaries, finches, budgies and tiels.
petiteoiseau is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to petiteoiseau For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014), wyrinth (05-12-2014)
post #9 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 09:17 AM Thread Starter
 
Julie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 183
Thanks: 11
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Send a message via Yahoo to Julie
Hi,
Thank you so much for writing this. I hate the thought of clipping wings, although I've been bad and have been netting my birds to get them back into their cages, because I can't come up with a better way. I work nites so working with them at dusk won't happen. Everyone at this forum and the parrotlet forum clip wings to get the immediate results they want. If I were a bird I'd rather be dead than get my wings clipped after all its who I am. The quality of their life is changed drastically, like it we were to loose both our legs living in a wheel chair is also a drastic change. I know they say they grow back, but the bird doesn't know this at the time and the stress the poor things undergo, Wow. My two aren't enticed for millet or other treats to go back in cage So I don't know how to get them back in any thoughts on this?

Julie
Julie is offline  
post #10 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 09:48 AM



 
catalinadee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 17,637
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 2,007 Times in 1,575 Posts
Rep Power: 99
                     
Have you tried just leaving the cage open? They usually know where to find their food and will often go looking for it. Being a smaller bird, they have a higher metabolism so they will get hungry quite fast

And about leaving breeding birds be. I think adding the stress of me handling a completely wild aviary bird every single day would not allow them to be settled enough to enjoy their lives and breed. I cannot see why parrotlets wouldn't do well in aviaries? I think all birds do far better in aviaries than they ever would in cages and everybody I have known with parrotlets who have kept them in aviaries have been more than happy. Here's a video I filmed of a pair of green rumped parrotlets with their chick

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_p9YY0l0Tl4

Very happy bubbas!

I also filmed this at a show called Think Parrots. It was extremely busy with people everywhere but the aviary birds (various parrotlets and black cheeked lovebirds) were at ease

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGK9_PKJwBc

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
catalinadee is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to catalinadee For This Useful Post:
wyrinth (05-13-2014)
post #11 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 12:56 PM


 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 462
Thanks: 133
Thanked 222 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 7
   
Yes, they were alert and watchful but not overly worried or anywhere near freaking out. That's the way my caged birds act when there is strange people around, they watch them because they don't know them but they are not frantic or even very upset about their presence.

As to how to get them into their cage, if you put your lights on dimmers and reduce the intensity, they will go in. The only reason why a bird is not lured by millet is if the bird is been free-fed seeds. Feed them gloop, chop or mash for breakfast and save the seeds for when you want them to go back into the cage and you'll see that millet does work. But, if you have been netting them, it's going to take a loooooooong time for them to trust you anywhere near them. The longer you net them, the worse it will be.
petiteoiseau is offline  
post #12 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 01:02 PM


 
4thebirds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: California
Posts: 1,616
Thanks: 1,109
Thanked 903 Times in 591 Posts
Rep Power: 17
             
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie View Post
Hi,
Thank you so much for writing this. I hate the thought of clipping wings, although I've been bad and have been netting my birds to get them back into their cages, because I can't come up with a better way. I work nites so working with them at dusk won't happen. Everyone at this forum and the parrotlet forum clip wings to get the immediate results they want. If I were a bird I'd rather be dead than get my wings clipped after all its who I am. The quality of their life is changed drastically, like it we were to loose both our legs living in a wheel chair is also a drastic change. I know they say they grow back, but the bird doesn't know this at the time and the stress the poor things undergo, Wow. My two aren't enticed for millet or other treats to go back in cage So I don't know how to get them back in any thoughts on this?

Julie
What you are saying about wing clipping could be true for birds who have been used to flight their whole lives. My parrotlet was in a cage the size of a shoe box his whole life prior to coming with me and was never handled or let out. His cage was in a shed detached from the house and so he rarely saw people. There was no way he could have flown in that cage if he wanted to. I can guarantee he is much happier now then he was for those first two years. For animals, they live in the moment so we can only go so far in attempting to understand how they think and feel. I am pretty sure loneliness and boredom were a bigger part of his thoughts from moment to moment.

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." ~Anatole France
Owned by & slave to: Oliver, Gemma, Cozette, & the English Budgie Crew

Last edited by 4thebirds; 05-13-2014 at 05:35 PM.
4thebirds is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to 4thebirds For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014)
post #13 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
 
Julie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 183
Thanks: 11
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Send a message via Yahoo to Julie
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4thebirds View Post
What you are saying about wing clipping could be true for birds who have been used to flight their whole lives. My parrotlet was in a cage the size of a show box his whole life prior to coming with me and was never handled or let out. His cage was in a shed detached from the house and so he rarely saw people. There was no way he could have flown in that cage if he wanted to. I can guarantee he is much happier now then he was for those first two years. For animals, they live in the moment so we can only go so far in attempting to understand how they think and feel. I am pretty sure loneliness and boredom were a bigger part of his thoughts from moment to moment.

Just think how much happier they would be if they could fly.
Julie is offline  
post #14 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 05:32 PM


 
wyrinth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: NYC, USA
Posts: 1,058
Thanks: 1,411
Thanked 748 Times in 515 Posts
Rep Power: 12
       
We don't really know what birds are thinking, although scientists are getting more insight into the animal mind all the time.

Pet keeping is like parenting, in that everyone thinks their way is the best (otherwise, you wouldn't be using that method )

Wing clipping is a hot button issue--let's just agree that some people can't stand to see their birds' wings clipped, others don't see a problem ...and at this point we don't really know how the birds weigh in.

As for the original question on how to get them back in the cage, you mentioned that the birds can target train in the cage? Can you work on training them to go to a specific perch on command? (add a command before you target, then wean them off the target and work only with the word). Don't let them out until they learn that in the cage. Do the same thing with the cage door open. It would be great if you had another cage they could fly into before having to return to their "perch". .... just some ideas that I would try if I had the same situation as you.

Stitch Pikachu Thor Loki

BlazeCinder Sunday

Storm Sky
wyrinth is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to wyrinth For This Useful Post:
4thebirds (05-13-2014), Julie (05-13-2014)
post #15 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 05:50 PM


 
4thebirds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: California
Posts: 1,616
Thanks: 1,109
Thanked 903 Times in 591 Posts
Rep Power: 17
             
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie View Post
Just think how much happier they would be if they could fly.
He wouldn't be happier dead by breaking his neck or getting out in the wild thru an open crack and unable to find his way home. I know that. In many ways I feel like letting a wild, untame/untrained pet bird (one that could not survive in the wild) fly around loosely, is the equivalent of letting a 2 year old child wonder outside alone near a swimming pool. It is just asking for trouble and tragedy. A trained pet bird is different and it is the owner's call to decide if they trust the relationship enough to risk whether or not the bird would come in an emergency situation. I feel it is my responsibility to make sure that my pets have all of these things as much as possible. Just like the previous poster said, we all have our differing opinions about raising our pets. But my main focus for my pets is the same as it is for any human I'd care for, including myself: health, nutrition, happiness, enrichment, safety, longevity, and love. So therefore, if they died in a preventable accident, suffered, and/or escaped, I would consider it a failure on my part and could never forgive myself. Their life and happiness is completely in my hands. It is just not something I take lightly and I would do anything to keep them safe, and protect their physical and mental well being. Not trying to sound rude or anything, it is just something I am very passionate about and something I committed to doing when I decided to take my pets into my home.

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." ~Anatole France
Owned by & slave to: Oliver, Gemma, Cozette, & the English Budgie Crew
4thebirds is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to 4thebirds For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014)
post #16 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
 
Julie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 183
Thanks: 11
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Send a message via Yahoo to Julie
Quote:
Originally Posted by wyrinth View Post
We don't really know what birds are thinking, although scientists are getting more insight into the animal mind all the time.

Pet keeping is like parenting, in that everyone thinks their way is the best (otherwise, you wouldn't be using that method )

Wing clipping is a hot button issue--let's just agree that some people can't stand to see their birds' wings clipped, others don't see a problem ...and at this point we don't really know how the birds weigh in.

As for the original question on how to get them back in the cage, you mentioned that the birds can target train in the cage? Can you work on training them to go to a specific perch on command? (add a command before you target, then wean them off the target and work only with the word). Don't let them out until they learn that in the cage. Do the same thing with the cage door open. It would be great if you had another cage they could fly into before having to return to their "perch". .... just some ideas that I would try if I had the same situation as you.
Thank you for your ideas. I target them to the cage door, but that is as far as they will go right now. Tomorrow I will try to target them to a perch and work on this for as long as it takes.....I will never understand how people can cut their birds wings. It baffles me! But thanks again for all your help.

Julie
Julie is offline  
post #17 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-14-2014, 10:47 AM


 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 462
Thanks: 133
Thanked 222 Times in 170 Posts
Rep Power: 7
   
Well, it's not 'what the birds think' but we do know certain things for sure (same as we do for parenting which is also not 100% a 'personal opinion' matter - if it was, there wouldn't be laws about it or governmental agencies that monitor and enforce them). We know that prey animals deprived of their predator avoidance mechanism are stressed out and that stress depresses their immune system and inhibits DNA repair, thereby shortening their lives (so clipping and longevity don't really go together from a scientific perspective). We do know that birds need flight to have a healthy respiratory system as the posterior air sacs don't get bellowed correctly without it and we do know that organs that are not used as they should will be are more prone to disease. We do know that deterioration of muscles and tendons is already visible after only 40 days of flight deprivation. And we do know that birds that flap their wings but do not achieve uplift are utilizing their muscles only at less than 10%. So, we might not know for a fact how they really feel about it but we do know that, from a physical point of view, not flying has negative consequences.

Clipping is a personal decision of the owner which most owners make because of safety and I am not judging anybody because I do think that we all do the best we can, but one can also say that, in reality, it's not so much a matter of safety but a matter of the owner lacking the proper infrastructure, household and/or lifestyle to live with a flighted bird. Because it's not true that flighted birds are at a higher risk than clipped ones. For one thing, it's what nature meant for them and, if it was inherently dangerous, the species would have become extinct a long time ago (quite the contrary, for a prey animal, nothing is safer than been flighted). Then one could say that although it's not dangerous in the wild, it is in captivity but, again, it's a matter of providing the proper conditions in captivity. I've had flighted birds my entire life (hundreds of them when I had the rescue, and zoos, sanctuaries and preserves don't clip their birds) and I've never had one die or get hurt because of it. It's like saying that a loose dog is at danger - and it would be if he was on the street or out in the country all by himself, but it would not be in the securely fenced-in backyard of his home.
petiteoiseau is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to petiteoiseau For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014)
post #18 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-14-2014, 03:57 PM



 
catalinadee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 17,637
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 2,007 Times in 1,575 Posts
Rep Power: 99
                     
Just want to add that I have known people lose their birds because they have fallen, clipped, and smashed their keel. I used to clip and now I wouldn't even consider it. That's my personal opinion though. I just think there's too many benefits to it

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
catalinadee is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to catalinadee For This Useful Post:
euphrosyne (06-16-2014)
post #19 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-14-2014, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
 
Julie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 183
Thanks: 11
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Send a message via Yahoo to Julie
Wink Success with bonded pair of parrotlets

Hi Everyone,

I received so much advice on how to train my two parrotlets. I want to thank you all. But I prefer not clipping wings, which is just my opinion. So I proceeded today with placing a perch into the cage offering millet. The first attempt they both flew to the sides of the cage to get away. I then removed their seed only leaving pellets and then an hour later I tried again. And the male climbed onto the perch and ate the millet. For some reason he doesn't like the female to eat from me and always chases her away, which is another problem to deal with. After he ate I then would try to reach the female but he wouldn't allow it. So I decided to work with the male so the third attempt he again climbed on the perch and she climbed up as far as she could without being bit from him and I fed her some millet.
So we will do this everyday and see how it goes. I'm planning on once they get comfortable I will then take him out and work with him outside the cage. Thankyou everyone for your help.

Julie
Julie is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Julie For This Useful Post:
wyrinth (05-14-2014)
post #20 of 28 (permalink) Old 05-14-2014, 07:09 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 86
Thanks: 0
Thanked 37 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
Ugh...the whole wing clipping thing is equivalent to vax or don't vax debate.
All of my birds are clipped when I first get them for SAFETY reasons until they learn the layout of my home, get used to the other birds, kids and have enough basic training.

Once the begin to molt they are allowed to remain flighted depending on the bird and it's personality. My P'lets have their wings, in fact i'm in strong need of air traffic control as I type this because I just got home which means they have been cooped up all day so now they are out buzzing my office like crazy.

My 'Tiels though are different matter. My females are allowed to keep their wings, one of my males has a short clip so he can get some pretty good distance but can't maintain long...the other male...yea, still working with him. He's a cranky bird.

Personally I don't want to find one of them injured because of flying off into something they shouldn't like a ceiling fan. I also have a lot of plants, some not suitable for the birds and children who may or may not always shut the doors. So again...personal choice but clipping isn't the end of the word as long as accommodations are made. As for loss of muscle tone I believe that is likely true IF the bird owner offers zero alternatives. Everyone I know who clips has playgyms, tons of toys, climbing structures and so on, all of which are designed to keep the bird in top physical and mental health.

I don't really see it any differently than pet owners who dock puppy tails, trim ears, brand livestock and so on. At least wing clipping doesn't have a blood supply unlike those other procedures and yet they are considered acceptable for those species. End. Of. Rant.

Oh and to someone's earlier comment about P'lets in an aviary...bad, bad idea. These are very tiny, highly intelligent, territorial and aggressive birds. They don't typically play well with others and that is why it's recommend not to place into aviary environment. Of course there are always exceptions to everything and i'm sure some individual birds do fine...but it's not the standard and Green Rumps are more docile than Pacific's anyway.
M'éanín's Mommy is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to M'éanín's Mommy For This Useful Post:
4thebirds (05-14-2014), euphrosyne (06-16-2014)
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Talk Parrots Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome