Bonding - Talk Parrots Forums

Parrot Behavior, Bonding and Training Discuss parrot behavior, parrot training, parrot bonding, and other psychological aspects of parrot care.
Thread Description: does it happen

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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-04-2016, 11:45 AM Thread Starter
 
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Bonding

Hi,


After reading a previous thread it got me to thinking.. Look out.
If bonding truly exists or not. What are the signs that a bird has truly bonded to you? You see the professionals where they lay the birds on their backs and the bird lets the do whatever they want to them. This Im sure is a very tight bond. But I mean how many of us actually get there?


What is everyones opinion of having a bonded bird?


Julie
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-04-2016, 12:26 PM



 
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I've had many birds bond with me as well as other family members and a few friends as well.

I was the main caretaker and constant in the birds lives and I felt that it all came down to how much time I spent with the birds daily and physically. The more I played and had hands on with my birds and shared this time with friends and family it helped the birds accept other people in their lives so they could benefit from more personal bonding and interaction.

This paid off in the long run because I could travel or be away and know the birds would be cared for by people who could interact and physically have hands on with them.

It's all about the amount of time I put into the birds daily routine that made the bonds so strong while training, even though the birds were trained well and had strong bonds I never stopped giving them this attention all of their lives. I kept training/bonding with them daily weekly monthly so they knew this was the norm.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-05-2016, 03:19 PM Thread Starter
 
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Mr Peepers,


You didn't answer my question. What does a parrot do to demonstrate that he is bonded to you? I understand the more time you spend with them the better it is. Im looking for how the bird shows you he is bonded to you.


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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-05-2016, 05:57 PM



 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie View Post
Mr Peepers,


You didn't answer my question. What does a parrot do to demonstrate that he is bonded to you? I understand the more time you spend with them the better it is. Im looking for how the bird shows you he is bonded to you.


Thanks
Julie

My birds have always flown to me to get my attention, especially when there are friends or family over. It's been suggested my birds get a little jealous of being left out of the activity of entertaining.

They bob and weave in an excited manor back and forth when I talk to them and come very close to the bars of the cage up close to my face.

I've had birds preen me and snuggle on my shoulder near my neck and face and fall asleep. I've also had snuggly birds try to feed me. YUCK!

I usually notice the flock calling when I'm elsewhere in the house.... the calls go on and on when I yell back to them or in this case when I yell back to SPX he will be quiet for a few minutes waiting until I come back in the room then he comes to hang out with me.

That's bonded to me.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-06-2016, 06:21 AM



 
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Personally, I don't think that birds actually bond with people. I think they ACT like they're bonded to you but given the chance I feel they would forget us in a minute to have an actual mate of their own. I read a very interesting article by Eb Cravens on bonding in Parrots Magazine years ago called Is it friendship, tolerance or true bonding? I'll try and quote the bit that stood out to me the most

"How can an adult psittacine be bonded to a bird of a different species, or one of the same gender, or to a human being? It cannot. It may go through the motions of certain friendships and sexual rituals. It may want to allopreen gently and inter-feed with regurgitation and undertake the foreplay for copulation with its perceived 'closest companion'. But in the end, all the affections and intimacy and sexuality are mere substitutions instigated by the parrot in an attempt to fill the void of not having a suitable mate with which to raise a family. My dearest pet parrots are no more bonded to me than they are bonded to their favourite toy, sleeping box, or personal food dish. They protect all of these; derive pleasure from being close to all these; even occasionally try to regurgitate to or breed with these. But it important for owners to distinguish between such transferred behaviour and true bonding. 'False perceived bonding' I call this, and it will often be undertaking by some naive, captive bred psittacines, who, because of a cloistered upbringing and lack of life experiences, are ignorant of the real concepts of family in their avian species. False perceived bonding is a dead end of sorts. They cannot evolve towards a natural outcome of affections, will be unable to consummate the urges prompting the false bonding, and more than likely, will turn to depression, overeating, self abuse, aggression or other dysfunctional behaviours when they begin to come to the conclusion that 'something is awry'"

It put a lot of things in to perspective for me and I feel that this is the reason why I have a lot more success now breeding my budgies. They live out in the aviary all year round and choose their own mates. Once I spot the truly bonded pairs I then put them in their own quiet breeding cage. Before I would just grab a male and female and hope for the best but it didn't work out great. Birds of the opposite sex tend to just merely tolerate one another to for fill the need to breed

I hope that helps a bit haha

- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-06-2016, 02:07 PM Thread Starter
 
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Wow, you might as well just breed fish, not relating to your birds very much. How much fun can that be? To each their own. I enjoy interacting with my birds. They're personalities are so different with each bird that I enjoy.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-06-2016, 05:54 PM



 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie View Post
Wow, you might as well just breed fish, not relating to your birds very much. How much fun can that be? To each their own. I enjoy interacting with my birds. They're personalities are so different with each bird that I enjoy.

That's one thing I do enjoy about having birds in my life, they are all different with their own personality's so its always interesting.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-07-2016, 05:42 AM



 
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I don't relate to my birds much or Eb Cravens who wrote the article? I had a house full of rescued companion parrots who I doted on until we had a gas leak so yes, I did have fantastic relationships with them and loved them dearly. However, due to this I now feel unsafe keeping birds indoors and have given most of them given to me a life outside where they can forage, meet others, fly and not be bothered by me. Most of my birds were unwanted. I have a few birds kept in the conservatory where we have separate airflow from the house (it's a different house anyway) and 2 of those 3 are disabled and 1 is needy so they wouldn't suit living in an aviary. Those 2 disabled birds are petrified of people and I can only describe their fearfulness as like post traumatic stress disorder. It's awful but I can't sit there cuddling them. We have a mutual understanding in our relationship where they know I won't come near them if they don't want me to but I do bring them food in the morning and afternoon as well as changing the cage frequently. The Indian ringneck doesn't throw herself to the floor of her cage any more and I can sit with her but I respect her and I actually enjoy having her in my life. Likewise my Alexandrine, Holly, I thoroughly enjoy but she would take a chunk out of me at any given moment if given the chance. She also had it rough but is a lot more trusting and will approach me if I sit near the cage. She makes me crack up, she's always chatting to me and being cute, looking for a head scratch and the moment I go near her she tries to break my fingers! She only got me once and it was when she made a beeline for me after trying to change her food out for the morning, left quite the scar

Birds who truly want to be with you will go crazy when they see you, call when you leave the room, hang on to the cage like something demonic when you're about but haven't let them out, beg for head scratches and cuddles, fly to you, preen you (don't ever let them at a freckle haha), potentially regurgitate for you and in some cases around sexual maturity or during certain months a few may try and mate with you (with larger birds this HURTS like crazy trying to get them off, they are tough lovers!). It's all down to the individual bird. Holly the Alexandrine particularly likes my grandmother because she pops in and gives her grapes. She can put her hands in there, tickle her etc. and she won't bat an eyelid but if I walk in the room I'm begged for still but I always get lunged at. I've noticed a lot of people's partners make friends with birds more so than we do haha!
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- Alexandrine parakeets Holly, George, Koda & - Crimson rosella Kasumi Orange winged Amazon parrot Paulie
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-07-2016, 01:16 PM
 
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Yes, to each his own. What Daisy does is not wrong in any way whatsoever. Her budgies are very happy the way they live and Daisy enjoys observing them and caring for them in the way she does and she finds it rewarding. Daisy has had her fair share of companion birds and as she's stated, almost all of the larger species she brings in are rescues and not always so eager to cuddle. It's a good thing that she takes the time to earn their trust and not push them to be uncomfortable or scared just because she's impatient.
Let's learn from each other here, not criticize.



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