Tame Birds - Talk Parrots Forums

Parrot Behavior, Bonding and Training Discuss parrot behavior, parrot training, parrot bonding, and other psychological aspects of parrot care.

 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 01:40 AM Thread Starter


 
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Tame Birds

Here are just some of the birds I have interacted with in just the last 3yrs.
I am posting this thread to show that you do not need to clip a birds feathers to hand tame it.
I have been criticized for speaking out that I do not think clipping is a useful tool for training. In fact it is a negative tool.
I know I cannot change some people's minds. But if you are new to bird owning at least I can show that super tame birds can be achieved without clipping.
Some will claim it is to keep them safe from flying into things. To this I reply they do need to be given the chance to learn.
You would not take a bike away from a child because it fell off ? Well ok some may I guess.
Here are three groups.

Those that have never been clipped.
This little one had two broken legs and we fixed him up and I used to take him outside and shopping with me. While he was at the rescue.


Angel (not my Angel) She did fly away from her owner, but we did re unit them.


Ricky. Yes he was cage aggressive, but I still managed to tame him.


Paco A border I had stay for 11 weeks


Coco. A mates daughters pet. Staying over while they were on Holiday



Tweety My first Tiel. Handicapped


Elvis Old and caged all his life but never clipped.



Pandis mind you I was the first person in 12yrs that he bonded to.


Comfortable Baby Tiels My own parent raised young ones.


These ones are tame, but I cannot confirm if they have been clipped in the past or not.

Cindy


Name unknown.


Name unknown



A little lovie who may not of been clipped but I put him here anyway as I am not sure. He had a bit of history while with us! He flew out the door twice and he came back to the rescue each time. Guess he wanted to stay and because he could fly was able to fly back to us.


Hammer


And two that do not fly
Potato who has destroyed his follicles and will never feather up again


? The pic of Zammy seems to have been removed?

Zammy so here is another just in case I have upset someone with my Throwing antics with Zammy.
He is super bonded to me and we have a trust that not many will ever achive.
When you can take a bird and throw it up in the air and it just drops down for you to catch it, is something else.
And something that should not be tried at home.
Bird Tossing DO NOT TRY THIS - YouTube


All these guys are tame or at least hand tame with me.
There are others but I cannot locate the photos at the moment.


A tribute to my lost ones. RIP.

Last edited by clawnz; 08-25-2012 at 05:23 PM. Reason: bird outside without harness, photo removed.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 04:15 AM


 
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Wonderful birds.
It is an age old argument.
I had my IRN clipped as he kept hurting himself while avoiding training.
Now he is calm, less aggressive and fully flighted.
I'm teaching him to fly from a to b.
It is lovely to have someone of your experience on the forum.
I love seeing all the photos.

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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 05:46 AM



 
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My birds are clipped and then are allowed to have them grow out, this only applies to the birds I have indoors of course, there's absolutely no chance I'd clip the aviary birds. I clipped them to start with as nearly all but one are aviary birds that I have indoors, most are rehomes. They've never ever been handled. My lovebird Blackjack must be coming up to 20 years old according to his ring but he's never been handled in his life until he came to my friends. She wanted him clipped so I clipped him for her and he tamed down very quickly, I can happily handle him every day now with no trouble at all (he is fully flighted now). His babies are completely different though, they're not clipped any more and they were both aviary raised but handled every day. It totally depends on the birds personality. Many hand raised birds might not need a clip at all when they are bought home but a lot of aviary birds I've taken in have needed a clip at first because they literally just whizz around the room freaking out. Once they've had their flights trimmed back they calm right down and accept me as the one who's going to get them from A to B. I have stopped clipping now, as I'm moving out into my own home within the next few months and I intend on making it bird safe. I hand raise birds and I kept one back for my self, well, I gave him to my partner. We haven't clipped him and he still whizzes around when he wants to but he flies back to us, which is nice. I don't want to clip anymore. And I haven't for a while now. I don't really agree with the 'never given the chance to fly' statement though, because if a bird is raised in an aviary situation, where they're flying as soon as they leave the nest, how would they not hit windows and stuff when you first bring them in? Sometimes it can't be helped. Obviously big stickers and stuff on windows help a lot! But not everybody can get them. I keep my blinds and curtains shut usually when the birds are out because although all of them can fly well, they STILL manage to crash into windows. The babies are dreadful for doing it! When I let my American kestrel (no I have never clipped a bird of prey nor would I, I think it could be illegal, either way it's a horrible though being as I keep them to fly them free outdoors anyways!) go in the house for quick training sessions when the weather is bad or something, he STILL ends up knocking into the mirror every now and then. He can fly perfectly fine, he's brilliant most of the time and he's always lived free, but mirrors and windows can be bird killers nonetheless. I do agree though, it isn't always neccessary to clip a bird at all. Especially if there is no need for it and it's just what suits the person. If it suits the person only then they shouldn't be keeping birds they're all gorgeous birds though

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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 06:50 AM Thread Starter


 
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"How would they not hit windows and stuff when you first bring them in? Sometimes it can't be helped."

I guess by being given the chance to learn. And it is better if they are given that chance when they are learning to fly right at the start.
But in saying that.
Tweety Tinkerbell and Angel were taken from parent raised aviary situation and allowed to fly free in the flight (all glass) from day one. They have had no problems with all the glass that has left then hurt?
Tinkerbell is my pocket rocket and is one of the fastest Tiels I have seen in flight.And although she is the one bird I cannot connect to, and will try to be where I am not, still learned to fly away from me without smashing into any glass.
In a night fright it does not matter where it is glass wood anything solid, or each other, they can crash, although Tink seems to be able to manage even in the dark.
But even the home stays seem to manage when they come here as well, so I have no real idea why it works for me and my situation. Except maybe here they are not panicked and at peace with their surroundings.

While helping out at the rescue I would try and fly as many of the caged birds as I could whenever possible.
I realize not everybody has my ability to make that inter mate connection with animals. And I had the luck to have the opportunity to interact with a lot of birds over a short time.
One of the best moments I have had at the rescue, was having a wild Morepork (New Zealand Owl) decide I was a good person and walk up my arm and sit on my shoulder. We had it out of the cage to take photos prior to it's release back into the wild. Otherwise we would not handle any wild birds any more than necessary. These are like Falcon and have mean talons, and we would not let them get hold of you due to the damage their claws would do. I got to walk him around the bird room and then put him in the box for transporting. Lyn said she had not seen anything like that in all the time she had been working with the birds. I did not list it above as it was a wild bird and did not count as tame.


A tribute to my lost ones. RIP.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 08:20 AM



 
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I'm lucky to have kept raptors for a long time now and I even began working with them properly. They're not the same as parrots in my opinion. There's just a completely different vibe! I feel that perhaps your cockatiels are more relaxed for the fact they're cockatiels! Or as they live cage free, are completely used to their surroundings. I find it amazing that they never crash some birds just don't see it! I don't get many birds have night frights, I don't think we've ever had a bad one. Am I correct in saying that the New Zealand owl is a Boobook? I wouldn't be fussed about handling an owl of that size. We kept a Eurasian eagle owl called Maxi for a while and her feet were about the same size as a male golden eagle, she was an ex display bird that needed rehoming and we took her in on my Uncle's land for a while. She passed away during the winter. Very sad. How come she was in the rescue? I'm glad she was able to be released! Sadly quite a few birds don't make it that far

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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 03:07 PM Thread Starter


 
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Hi Catalinadee. Well you are right! I had never heard it called that before. But after goggling it see that is one of the many names for it. Well done.
New Zealand Owl is more commonly called a Morepork. It's a fairly small owl.
We get them in for any number of reasons. And it would of been from the wild not a tame one. We are not allowed to keep most NZ birds in captivity. The only one I can think of is the Kakariki and then you do need to be a registered holder.
A lot of them and our wild pigeon fairly often arrive after flying into glass windows. So yes I do understand the dangers of glass.
But they do have other accidents as well. With the babies it could be that they have dropped out of the nest and someone has found them and bought them into the rescue. As with all birds that take prey with their claws, as you know, you need to respect those talons, because if they get into you they are going to be very painful and hard to force out.
Our Tuhi is another that has mean long needle claws. I made a mistake with one a client bought in and it got me in the hand. I finished showing the people around with the bird attached, holding it still, waiting for it to relax enough to remove it from my hand.

With the glass I make sure that they know it is there. So take them upto it and touch their beak on it and also tap it so they can learn it is solid, and they do seem to get it! Yes I would of had a few low speed bumps but no damage.
I feel most of the problems with Op situations could be that they are trying to get away from the situation and see the outside as away to do that, so run into the glass.
I feel we do not give them the respect for the intelligence they have. And I never try to force any of my birds to do something. Unless I have to catch one for weight check or a vet visit. otherwise they are left alone.
It's like I live in there world not them in mine. I am just the provider.

Green Bay Rescue can deal with well over 1,000 birds a year mostly from the wild and every species. The caged birds only number around a 100 or so a year.

Night frights? I feel I am lucky and there were not a common problem. But as the flock has grown, so they were starting to get the odd one. I now run a night light and have only had one since then. They are horrible even in the free flight, but at least none have suffered like Snowy did. Remember he was in a cage at the breeders when he destroyed most of his flights and tail. All I can do is get up and turn all the lights on and then start looking to see where they all are. Scattered far and wide. I do not try to pick them up as I know if they can they will nail me due to the panic in them.
So just sit and talk to them so they settle then if they will not go back to the gym get them with a towel and release them in front of the gym, so they can fly to it. If I get to close they start all over again, so that is not good.
At all times it pays to be calm around them, they are intelligent enough to sense when you are stressed. In fact I would say the most trouble I have had when working with the birds at the rescue was on days I was not in a great mood.


A tribute to my lost ones. RIP.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 03:41 PM


 
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I do not agree with clipping pet birds (poultry such as Geese so they don't fly out your garden and attack neighbourhood cats and dogs, yes).

I have never clipped any of my other birds, I had Rocky my Amazon as a rescue and I have never had him clipped, we all know what he was like when I first got him, he has flown into the window once when in a mad panic as he got into a different room, he has not done it since, right by his cage is a glass door and the first thing I did was go upto it and tap it and tell him he can not go through it he must avoid it, he has never gone near that door. He will sit on his cage and when near it he will look and he is always interested if I have it open and someone is in the other room and he can see them but he has made no attempt to go through it at any point, he fully understands that it is solid.

I have taken in birds who were clipped all their life and they have never managed to get to the same flying skills as my non clipped birds.

I would never advise a young bird be clipped they need the time as a chick to fully develop those muscles and the skills they need to avoid objects.

The only time I would ever clip any of my birds is in the case of Rocky or when I take in other rescue parrots and that is only if they ever become aggressive to the point of flying at people to attack them which is likely to occur during breeding season, as we all know Rocky hates my dad and will follow him across the top of his cage and try to bite him, I am slowly training this out of him but it is taking time due to his past treatment by men. Clipping him to stop him flying to attack would be a last resort, I'd rather ban people from the room when he is out and unless he decides to start flying and attacking me which would mean he can not be let out his cage safely he will not be clipped, in my opinion it is far safer and healthier for him to be fully flighted.

There is that saying on various bird forums, 'if you want a pet that can not fly, get a hamster' afterall we don't cut dogs legs off because we want to tame them.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-25-2012, 03:42 PM


 
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wow 1,000 birds a year!
It's my dream to run a parrot rescue if I ever had the money.
There are two bird rescues near me so hopefully if I can find some time I can help out.
One has begun to rescue parrots and asked me a few questions about them the other day so maybe next year I can help out.
The work you do is awesome.
especially in NZ.
Its one of my dream destinations as birds evolved out there to do the job of most mammals here.
do you ever get Kea's? or are they in another part of NZ?

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-26-2012, 07:29 PM
 
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Wow! Those birds are so lucky you came into their lives! Plus the fid tossing, teh bird really had to trust you to let you do that, so that is great!


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