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Julie 01-16-2014 11:20 PM

Finding Loving birds
 
How do you find a parrot that wants to be with you all the time. I'm. So jealous of hearing your stories of the attachments some of you have with your birds. Can you share with me how you do this? Or was the bird born thus way? Please let me know. I'm excited to hear your stories.

Julie

thekarens 01-17-2014 09:35 AM

It's a matter of spending time with them. Like all relationships the more time and effort you put into a relationship the more you get out of it.

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ParrotletsRock 01-17-2014 10:31 AM

You need to find the right breeder also... a breeder needs to socialize the birds, if they just handfeed ( via syringe or crop needle ) and then plops the bird back into the incubator is doing nothing to build trust and confidence in the birds. Both my tiel and my conure were handfed and socialized resulting in birds that see you as a flock member. A breeder that coparents, allowing the parents to feed and care for the chicks, but handles and socializes them is far better than a breeder that hand feeds and ignores the chicks. So just because a bird is advertised as handfed, that does not mean tame!

4thebirds 01-17-2014 10:50 AM

Loving humans is a learned behavior for parrots. It doesn't come natural. Any bird can become a good companion under the right circumstances. Of course you would have an advantage with a young, handfed, socialized parrot, but I have a great companion in all three of my birds. Their backgrounds are none were socialized prior to coming to me, one was an untame adult, the other two I got as babies and I have found that they adapt quicker than the one I got as an untame adult.

So, in short I think it depends on the time you invest and how patient you are with them.

ParrotletsRock 01-17-2014 11:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4thebirds (Post 192466)
Loving humans is a learned behavior for parrots. It doesn't come natural. Any bird can become a good companion under the right circumstances. Of course you would have an advantage with a young, handfed, socialized parrot, but I have a great companion in all three of my birds. Their backgrounds are none were socialized prior to coming to me, one was an untame adult, the other two I got a babies and I have found that they adapt quicker than the one I got as an untame adult.

So, in short I think it depends on the time you invest and how patient you are with them.

Yes I am sorry, I didn't mean to imply that only baby handfed birds are tame... but they are already friendly when you get them and it is much easier to form and bond with as they already associate humans with good things. Even an adult untame bird can become tame and friendly if given enough time and patience ( depending on the bird of course). That being said even handfed socialized birds can be flighty and skittish if that is their nature.

4thebirds 01-17-2014 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ParrotletsRock (Post 192490)
Yes I am sorry, I didn't mean to imply that only baby handfed birds are tame... but they are already friendly when you get them and it is much easier to form and bond with as they already associate humans with good things. Even an adult untame bird can become tame and friendly if given enough time and patience ( depending on the bird of course). That being said even handfed socialized birds can be flighty and skittish if that is their nature.

No need to apologize! I knew exactly what you meant. And I agree. You will have the advantage with a handfed baby. My adult rehome was handfed but then left in a cage in a shed for 2 and a half years. Maybe I had a slight advantage because he was handfed, but I am not sure because so much time had passed. He was pretty wild. I am sure there are cases where the bird's personality makes it so that if they are older, they just can't be tamed. Even my other two I got as babies-both handfed but not socialized-were extremely flighty at first. (Socializing isn't very common here. I generally get the feeling that touches by humans and socializing from just a few weeks old are probably more important than handfeeding.) But both handfeds I got as babies came around in a few weeks or months versus my adult rehome-it took him months to a year.

Julie 01-17-2014 03:29 PM

Thanks for the advice. Can I ask how many hours a day do you spend with your flock? I have six birds and I'm trying to divide my time.

Julie

catalinadee 01-17-2014 05:30 PM

I do think it is about time :) But it isn't the amount of time, it's the quality of time!

4thebirds 01-17-2014 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Julie (Post 192698)
Thanks for the advice. Can I ask how many hours a day do you spend with your flock? I have six birds and I'm trying to divide my time.

Julie

My birds come out and join all of the activity in the evenings on work-days for 1-2.5 hours each night. On weekends, they are out for about 4 hours each day. I am not directly interacting with them the whole time they are out. Most of the time they are playing by themselves or observing the goings on with intermittent scritches, kisses, and talking to them a lot. I try to give them my undivided attention (just me and them one-on-one) several times a week for 15-30 mins at a time.

petiteoiseau 01-18-2014 06:48 AM

It depends on several things.

1 - whether they were handfed and through which method (gavage been terrible, co-parenting been good)
2 - whether they socialized once they were weaned
3 - how long you've had them
4 - species (little ones don't really need humans if they have a companion of their own while large ones love human company)
5 - length of time you spend one-on-one (1.5 hours a day is not enough)
6 - quality of time you spend one-on-one (specific interactions)
7- which time of the day you do it (after breakfast and before dinner been the best)

thewandererw 01-27-2014 06:44 PM

I have two birds one budgie. And one tiel the budgie I''ve had for 2.5 years of that time he's been tamed for 1.5 years but he does not like scratches he will step up for millet though.and the tiel I''ve had for 7 months. He will eat food from my hand and will get real close to me but won't step up.or sit on ny shoulders or head yet.I talk to them all day.and give them one in one time twice a day.in the morning and before bed.


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candidpets 01-31-2014 03:50 PM

if the conure is young and hand raised they are just very clingy

aether-drifter 02-01-2014 11:56 AM

I adopted most of my birds from Craigslist and one from eBay classifieds...their personalities were described in their ads. And I was able to talk to the current owners and find out more, then go meet the birds for myself. Babies can change a lot as they mature, so I prefer to adopt adult birds whose personalities are not likely to change.

I have one cockatiel that I bought as a baby, and for the first few months she was super clingy with me and fairly affectionate. She would let me preen her and rub her head. As she grew up, she became more and more independent and bonded with one of my males. She still likes to fly to me sometimes, but gets annoyed if I try to touch or pet her. On the other hand, I have an adult male tiel who is the cuddliest, sweetest boy ever.

I think how "cuddly" or loving a bird is might be equal parts nature and nurture. That is to say, genetics play a part as well as socialization, and you can't forget that every bird is an individual. Just like us.

Most of my birds came from good homes and were loved, but they're all varying degrees of loving/affectionate. I'm glad not all of them want to be with me constantly or I'd have to clone myself!

thewandererw 02-01-2014 03:57 PM

I beleave it's how much a person spends with the bird to and if there are other birds in the house. My tiel didn't get much people time before I got him he lived out in the garage. And I also have a budgie too so they spend most of there time together.

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candidpets 02-02-2014 09:25 AM

yeah i was not sure on it but it seems some birds if they have other species around they talk to and interact with they dont crave us as much for some reason

petiteoiseau 02-02-2014 11:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by candidpets (Post 201818)
yeah i was not sure on it but it seems some birds if they have other species around they talk to and interact with they dont crave us as much for some reason

The reason is that nature made them to live with other birds and not with humans.


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