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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Kakarikis are starting to become quite endangered in NZ, but today, I was lucky enough to see a whole flock. :lovehearts:

I'd seen, and heard, one in that area before, but I'd never seen it properly. And I'd only ever noticed 1.

I first heard that distinctive chattering call, then 2 took off into the sky and I knew (being a bit bird obsessed) that it couldn't have been any other bird, and that it was a kakariki.

Suddenly, the 2 were joined by 2 more, and alighted on a branch near me, where another was sitting.

I saw the distinctive red head of a red crowned, which, even though is the commonest kak', is not really anywhere near common.

I felt so privileged to see them fly from tree to tree, one even flew about 1 meter over my heard! I must have looked a bit strange, staring up into the sky and running from tree to tree like a mad thing!

It was so amazing to see that they are finally becoming more common in NZ!

Here are a few pics of kak's (i didn't take them btw)



f320af841dbaaf0ade16.jpeg

Kakariki_red-300x225.jpg

The flock is pretty much exactly what I saw at first!

LOC_kakarikiFlock.jpg
 

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Kakarikis

Ella,

That's pretty cool you could see them in the wild. We have some parrots in the wild here in the U.S. but they are all "exotics" (non-native) so their future here is uncertain. Some governments would like to exterminate them, fearing they could become agricultural pests. We had a native parrot, the Carolina Parakeet, but they are now sadly extinct.

The best place to see parrots in the U.S. is around Miami, Florida. There several species breed and you can sometimes see big flocks of them. For the most part, these parrots stay in and around suburbs because (I assume) they can find food at bird feeders and from exotic vegetation planted around homes, where they may find the food plants they used in their native countries. They still haven't spread out into the wild parts of Florida yet so they may not be able to live far from people. The most common parrot in the U.S. seen in the wild is the Quaker or Monk Parakeet. They are adapted to living in colder areas than Florida and some colonies even exist in northern states with cold winters. But they also like warm weather and there are plenty of them in Florida too.

I have seen some postings about Kakarikis so I am guessing there are captive bred populations that are pets today. I've never seen one in the U.S. but maybe we have them somewhere.
 

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Yes sadly we did have the Carolina Parakeet who did go extinct. From the taxidermied specimens most scientists think that it was a species of conure. If it were still alive today, it would still be seen in my area. What a shame.
 

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Carolina Parakeet

I think the Carolina Parakeet looks very close a conure.

Carolina Parakeet:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It was a great moment.

I live for those kind of special moments!
 
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