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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tracy asked for suggestions for affectionate birds. I thought we could start a thread about this to answer her question.

First, Tracy, I think the most important thing is the individual bird. All species have individuals with very different personalities. The biggest thing will be finding the individual that clicks with you. A bird that enjoys human interaction when you first get it will likely continue to do so. I am assuming this is to be your first bird, but please correct me if I am wrong.

Certain species are generally known to be more hands-on than other species. My first suggestion for birds known to enjoy touching would be cockatiels. They are dusty, but if you can tolerate the dust, the ones who are raised with good interactions with people usually continue to enjoy people.

My second suggestion would be a conure. The smallest conures, like the green cheeks, black caps, crimson bellies, etc., are relatively quiet. They are very active and funny, and if they have been raised to enjoy human interaction they continue to crave it. Be forewarned that they do bite, so be certain you won't be afraid of the bird by experiencing a few bites first to make sure you can tolerate them. The bites don't bother me, but they do bother some people. The larger conures, like the blue crowns, patagonians, suns, etc. are generally louder. Some are very, very vocal. They are also active and funny. Many of them are very affectionate.

Those are simply my first suggestions. You may prefer something smaller or larger. You may have a great deal of experience with birds. If you could give us some more information we could offer further ideas.
 
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I would also think about a Quaker. They are funny and mischievous in a cute way. They like to be outside of their cage and they pick up on word easily. Unlike the conure that barely speaks and has a rough voice. The nloise level..... eh for me is acceptable. Once when my father worked at the petstore. There was this quaker and everytime someone was going to buy. My dad would reach in and the quaker pretended like he was scared but then when my dad finally caught him the quaker would start laughing imitating the macaw's laugh.
 

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Went to the bird breeders today and saw a baby meyer's parrot- I think I'm gonna get him (I think it's a male not sure) it's real laid back and sweet. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a senegal, which is in the same family as the meyers. If the bird is already affectionate, I would expect it to remain affectionate. In general, meyers are supposed to be nicer than senegals.

I will tell you what my senegal is like, and then you can consider that a meyers will likely be a little less intense than my senegal is.

As far as affectionate goes, I would consider her affectionate. She likes me to pet her on the head and neck for sevearl minutes at a time, and would be up for that several times a day. I have known senegals who like to be petted all over, but I do not pet Roni all over because it gives her the wrong idea. It makes her think I want to be her mate, and I don't want her to think that.

Roni is smart and learns tricks easily. She is great at entertaining herself, which is very important because that means I do not have to give her more attention than I have time to give her.

She talks a little, and she uses the few words that she has appropriately. She is good about staying on a play stand when that is what she needs to do.

African birds tend to become frightened easily, although meyers less so in general than senegals. It is important to calmly and consistently introduce them to many things while they are young to help with this. Senegals are prone to becoming one-person birds, but meyers are more likely to like everyone in the family if all family members treat them well.

Roni does tend to become over-stimulated. When that happens, she can bite quickly. Therefore, I watch her body language, and when she is too wound up I do not hold her. Even though she can and does bite at these times, she has never bitten hard enough to break the skin or leave a welt. She could. She has not.

Poicephalus do not tend to scream, but they do have a loud beep that to some people sounds like fingernails on a chalk board. Be certain that you have heard this call before you commit to a poicephalus. The call is not painful to my ears, but I know people who cannot tolerate it.

I do recommend poicephalus as pets. They enjoy petting, doing tricks, riding around on their people, and hanging out. They can easily be raised to enjoy a wide variety of toys and to entertain themselves in their cages and on play stands. Additionally, meyers are supposed to be one of the calmest and gentlest of all of the poicephalus.
 

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If I had seen this earlier I would have also said cockatiels. They're such lovely birds.

Great to know you're looking into the meyers though!
 
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