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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Upon the truly sad passing of my beloved parakeet Milo, whom I raised from a hatchling, I am ready for another bird.

I am thinking on the lines of:

Budgie
Cockateil
Parrotlet
Quaker

I have between 1-4 hours to spend with the bird on school days, and up to 8+ each day on the weekend.

The cage I currently have is 1/2in spaced, 25 long, 15 wide, and 24 tall. I may be getting a larger cage though.

Help with some procs and Cons of each species? Here's what i have so far..


Budgie:
Pros:
Small Size
Easily Tamed
Available in two locations nearby hand-raised.
Not very loud
Not a hard biter

Cons:
Reminds me of my bird that passed.
My father is considering making me get two birds, and I know two budgies would bond very closely and practically ignore me on occasion.

Cockateil:
Pros:
Small size
Not a terrible biter
Not expensive

Cons:
Can be quite loud/screeching.

Parrotlet:
Pros:
Very Intelligent
Small Size
Not terrible biters
Not very loud

Cons:
Pairs have been known to be aggressive, and have to be separated.
Often Cage aggressive.
Difficult to find hand-raised babies locally.
Somewhat more expensive.

Quaker Parrot:
Pros:
Intelligent, and sweet.
Nice Vocabulary
Two handraised babies locally. (although I'd only get one in this case.)

Cons:
A bit larger, with a larger beak.
Demands more attention to reduce feather plucking.
Would most likely need a larger cage.
some can be quite loud.



Any help here?
 

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Well it looks like you wrote all the pros & cons...now you just need to make your choice. LOL For me, I'd take the Parrotlet. A Linnie is even better but that's not one of your choices so....:) Good luck picking, it's hard isn't it?
 

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Lets see... Parrotlets can be loud in a pair, and you'd be surprised how much their bites hurt. They can definitely break the skin, tend to go for the softest parts of your hand, and grind their little beaks. Quakers are very vocal birds - that doesn't necessarily mean screaming, but they are very vocal and contact call a lot to keep in touch with their flock. If you can redirect their natural contact call to something more pleasant, which isn't too difficult, you shouldn't have a noise problem with them.

I would be partial to the Quaker, personally, but it's ultimately your decision. You most definitely need a bigger cage for a quaker - I recommend one of the HQ or A&E single flight cages. They run about $125 and are really big durable cages :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies guys!

I know one lady selling blue parrotlet babies for 50$. They are three months old, but not truly tame. I'm not sure how well that sounds, regarding going through the trouble of taming them.

The person with the quaker has a pair of green split to blue babies for 125$ each. They are hand tame, but one he claimed was biting a bit the other day.


Would a cage that is 31in long, by 20.5in wide, by 52in high (including stand) be okay?

Here's a link to it:
http://www.petco.com/product/112008...ght-Bird-Cage.aspx?CoreCat=BirdFC_Cagesstands
 

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I am sorry that you lost Milo.

Your list of pros and cons is thorough. You've done your homework and thought a lot about this.

For me, I have a hard time getting an animal that is too much like one I have lost. That is why I might suggest staying away from another budgie. If it doesn't upset you to get another budgie, though, you loved Milo and you know what to expect.

I think I would not go with a semi tame parrotlet, and I think I would definitely NOT go with two semi tame parrotlets. You have choices of tame birds available. That is just me.

I happen to really like quakers and cockatiels, so I am biased there. I think either a cockatiel or a quaker could get pretty noisy. I think that cage would be fine for either if the bars are heavy enough and the welds are strong. I didn't look at the add well enough to find out if it talked about the wire size.

Quakers are known for becoming very protective about their cages. You can't get upset at it because it is a natural instinct for them. Keep it in mind, if you get one, as you are raising it. Teach it to step up on and ride on a perch as well as on your hand so that you can always take it away from the cage later by having it step up on a perch. When they are away from the cages, they are fine. Some people also advise having smaller "sleeping" cages for quakers so that they will consider the smaller perch the "nest". I don't know if that works or not, but it sounds logical. :shrug:

I'm sure you will be happy with whatever bird you choose.
 

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All I can really say is a hand-reared quaker doesn't scream that much but damn if it isn't tame it will SCREAM. A cockatiel sounds about right really. Not hard-biters, fairly easy to tame, love to cuddle hehe, and I've never known an individual to be loud. The only time mine have ever been loud is in a group when there's a whole bunch of them freaking out hehe
 

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Have you considered a Bourke Parakeet?

Not to complicate things, but have you also considered a Bourke Parakeet? They are easy like Budgies but still somewhat exotic and uncommon. They are also pretty quiet, gentle, and, from my experience, don't bite. I don't think mine has ever bitten me in the one and a half years I've had her.

I haven't had a Budgie in a while but I can tell you their personalities are roughly similar. My Bourke "Twitter" was an older hand-raised baby (6 months old?) when I got her. It took her a little while to bond to me but now she's as tame as a tame Budgie. She was more or less finger-tame but otherwise shy for the first 2 months. Her flight feathers were growing back when I got her and I wanted to her to be able to fly eventually so I didn't re-clip. But this gave her the freedom to fly off my hand and back to the cage. She did this whenever I took her out at first. But I took her out every day anyway.

Eventually, I opened the cage door but went into the other room without her. She decided on her own to be friendly and flew to me. After that, our routine is basically I open the cage door, she flies around a little and then lands on my shoulder for while - flies somewhere else for a while - flies back to me, etc. I personally like pet birds that aren't glued to me all the time and can fly off when they want.

Bourkes are a little more reserved than most parrots. You have to be gentle with them to win their trust. So if you want a super-tame puppy-dog type parrot that you can handle alot, a Bourke may not be for you (or at least one that can fly). They are not the kind of bird you can expect to lay on their backs in your hand or hang upside-down, etc. But if you want a small friendly bird that is pretty quiet and gentle, you might consider a hand-raised Bourke.













I also have a Scarlet-Chested Parakeet, which is even quieter and more reserved in it's personality. He was hand-raised but took longer to come to me on his own. So I was just super patient and gentle. But now he too is fully-flighted and will fly on my arm.... when he feels like it. But he is always approachable and will hop on my finger if I go to him. Like my Bourke, he knows his way around my house and sunroom and can fly back to his cage on his own. He likes hemp seeds and baby green peas and both have helped me tame him.
 
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Upon the truly sad passing of my beloved parakeet Milo, whom I raised from a hatchling, I am ready for another bird.

I am thinking on the lines of:

Budgie
Cockateil
Parrotlet
Quaker

I have between 1-4 hours to spend with the bird on school days, and up to 8+ each day on the weekend.

The cage I currently have is 1/2in spaced, 25 long, 15 wide, and 24 tall. I may be getting a larger cage though.

Help with some procs and Cons of each species? Here's what i have so far..


Budgie:
Pros:
Small Size
Easily Tamed
Available in two locations nearby hand-raised.
Not very loud
Not a hard biter

Cons:
Reminds me of my bird that passed.
My father is considering making me get two birds, and I know two budgies would bond very closely and practically ignore me on occasion.

Cockateil:
Pros:
Small size
Not a terrible biter
Not expensive

Cons:
Can be quite loud/screeching.

Parrotlet:
Pros:
Very Intelligent
Small Size
Not terrible biters
Not very loud

Cons:
Pairs have been known to be aggressive, and have to be separated.
Often Cage aggressive.
Difficult to find hand-raised babies locally.
Somewhat more expensive.

Quaker Parrot:
Pros:
Intelligent, and sweet.
Nice Vocabulary
Two handraised babies locally. (although I'd only get one in this case.)

Cons:
A bit larger, with a larger beak.
Demands more attention to reduce feather plucking.
Would most likely need a larger cage.
some can be quite loud.



Any help here?
i would go with a green cheek counre as they are good talkers and great pets and cheap to buy and dont bite very hard
 

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Quaker parrots have an awful bite (ive never teared up over a bite , not even from my friends grey but I certintly did the time a quaker bit my hand) which in my opinion if he wasnt hand raised or handtamed , taming for you would take alot longer with alot of blood ( real blood) sweat and tears.

Linnies are amazing little playful guys :D
 

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Id either go with a parrotlet or a budgies.I have both and tiels and I must say parrotlets are the quietest.My tiels are the loudest.Tiels arent that small their medium size.The only con I can think of with a parrotlet(someone on here told me this)They eat more than a tiel.I dont find this true with my parrotlet but all are different!Parrotlet or budgies(if your looking for 2 go with budgies because parrotlets are territorial and can be aggressive with other birds)Sorry to hear of the passing of your birdy......
 
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