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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting a baby Senegal in a few days. I have a cage for her, which has inner dimensions of 24" X 23" X 35". It is made out of rather heavy gauge metal (about the same size as a 6 gauge piercing, if that means anything to anyone), which is powder coated, and has a removable playstand and slide-out tray on top.

The bottom grate is at least 6 inches from the bottom of the slide-out tray beneath the cage, so there is no way that the bird will be able to access anything that is under the grate of the cage.

What should I use in the bottom tray? I plan to line it with a couple of layers of newspaper, but then should I put something on top? I saw some bags of corn cob bedding in the store, with a picture of a parrot on the bag- is that a good material?

Or, what about wood chips? Is pine problematic?

Inside of the cage, I have a cuttlebone, a mineral block, three food/water cups (which each are attached to their own little swing-out door, so can easily be accessed to fill/clean from outside of the cage).

A large rectangular rope swing, a large twisty natural perch which hangs from a short length of chain on each side, one of those perches which is of plastic but varying diameter throughout its length.

And on top is a manzanita playstand, about 2+ feet tall with many different angles and sizes of branches to climb and perch on, and has 7 eye bolts to hang toys from (6 of which are occupied by hanging toys).

So she has toys made from combinations of rope, rawhide, metal, bells, wooden beads, plastic beads.

Does this sound good? Do I need to add something?
 

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Personally I just line the cage tray with paper and change it, but some people use other materials. I think that is personal preference, although be careful of anything with a strong odor. Birds are very sensitive to odor. I like just using the paper because I can see the consistency of the droppings that way. Also, that size tray is very easy to line with newpapers. :thumbsup:

I cannot tell from your description if you have a combination of soft woods and hard woods or not, but give both. The soft woods will be destroyed very quickly, but that is the point. I just give Roni little rectangular prisms of soft wood that she can hold and destroy, and she does. No need to pay for a toy made of that because it is gone too fast.

She may be afraid of certain toys at first. Nothing to worry about, and probably nothing you can predict, either. After a while she will take to most toys. Just let her ignore them for a while if she wants.

Change the items in her cage often, every few weeks. This will help keep her from developing as many phobic behaviors.

Expect her to be very introverted at first as she gets used to the new cage and family. She will blossom in time.
 

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I just use newspaper and change it every other day. The grate I wash once a week.

Do make sure there is soft wood for easy destructibility and hard wood for fun knawing. Scooter, and most senegals i have every met, LOVE to chew, and destroy wood.

And be sure to purchase or make foraging toys. I have 2 specific foraging toys for Scooter, and a few in other homemade toys. I have 3 dishes for Scooter. One is pellets, one is water, and the 3rd is treat/fresh food. Sometimes I fill his treat with beads, shredded paper and other materials and hide a treat below. This way he has to dig and look for his goodie like he would if he were in the wild :D It keeps him occupied and entertained
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I read that Senegals love pine nuts. I have many pine trees around, in my yard and elsewhere. I don't use any chemicals or toxins of any kind, so is it safe for me to hang a pine cone in her cage sometimes, for her to dig the pine nuts out of?
 

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Newspaper really is best. All other beddings trap dust and can harbor fungus and mold. Our local avian vet did some research on it, and found a much higher issue with respiratory infections related to bedding like that.

As long as the pine cones have nothing on them, sure, they make a fun treat!
 

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I think the pine nuts the article was referring to were the nuts you sometimes find in the stores that are also called pignolias. Roni loves pine nuts/pignolias, but she cannot break off the shells herself, so I have to give her shelled ones. I don't know if she will ever get to the point that she can break the shells or not. I suspect that if she realized what was inside, she might try harder to break off the shell, but she gives up as of now. Perhaps I should get some and crack them for her, because if she could break them she might enjoy it.

However, my senegal also does love pine cones. I have read that you should bake the pine cones from your own trees before giving them to the birds. I don't know how hot or how long. Does anyone else know? Pine cones are also great places to stuff other treats for foraging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, but the pine nuts in the store come out of pine cones. There are a couple of pine species that make exceptionally large pine nuts, but all of them are edible.
 
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