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Another lovely Daily Desktop Image~
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I thought they looked like graceful dancers, as well. Sooooo pretty!
And this lead me to look into the myth of storks delivering babies. Link: What's Behind the Myth That Storks Deliver Babies? | Live Science
Your link gives me a BAD PLACE TO GO WARNING .... so I couldn't view it.

So ... I googled storks and bb's and the common answer/story was about a myth during ancient Greece times and the story of a vengeful goddess named Hera. According to this story, Hera grew jealous of a beautiful queen named Gerana and transformed her into a stork. What a witch Hera was .... I watched a lot of Bible Story's and Hera seemed to have a real chip on her delicate jealous manipulative shoulders. She was always up to no good turning someone into this or that. SPITEFUL .... In fact ... Hera wanted to hurt or kill Zeus as well because she was jealous Zeus was being unfaithful. Hera has got some BALLS to wanna try and hurt Zeus.

Hera needed to be taken out to the back porch and whipped with a switch ... make her so she couldn't sit down for a week. Wait ... Hera could float or fly right? I guess a switchin wouldn't matter. Sheesh. How do you punish a Goddess?

I got it ... Make her have to wear earphones 24 - 7 and force her to hear the Baby Shark Doo Doo Dooo doooo song over and over again.

Good article Sweetus Peeus! I enjoyed learning about this old tale and myth.
 

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Your link gives me a BAD PLACE TO GO WARNING .... so I couldn't view it.

So ... I googled storks and bb's and the common answer/story was about a myth during ancient Greece times and the story of a vengeful goddess named Hera. According to this story, Hera grew jealous of a beautiful queen named Gerana and transformed her into a stork. What a witch Hera was .... I watched a lot of Bible Story's and Hera seemed to have a real chip on her delicate jealous manipulative shoulders. She was always up to no good turning someone into this or that. SPITEFUL .... In fact ... Hera wanted to hurt or kill Zeus as well because she was jealous Zeus was being unfaithful. Hera has got some BALLS to wanna try and hurt Zeus.

Hera needed to be taken out to the back porch and whipped with a switch ... make her so she couldn't sit down for a week. Wait ... Hera could float or fly right? I guess a switchin wouldn't matter. Sheesh. How do you punish a Goddess?

I got it ... Make her have to wear earphones 24 - 7 and force her to hear the Baby Shark Doo Doo Dooo doooo song over and over again.

Good article Sweetus Peeus! I enjoyed learning about this old tale and myth.
I'm sorry that the original link I gave you from Live Science had a warning attached to it.
I was able to access this webpage with a message at the top of the story that "Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission " So -- data tracking could be the culprit.

I clean my laptop every evening with CCleaner, which removes any cookies or trackers that could be traced to my computer. I also use Firefox which gives me a warning if any website could be suspicious.

However, I am glad you found the Hera story on your own -- because this fable was also described in the article that I linked to. But here are some excerpts from the Live Science website for you.

What's actually behind this association between storks and babies?
Like any myth, its origins are hard to trace, especially since this one spans the globe, appearing in folklore from Europe, the Americas, North Africa and the Middle East. The array of similar myths suggests that they all draw common inspiration from the birds' most noticeable features.
"The birds are big and white — linked to purity — and their nests are large, prominent and close to where people live. So, their good parenting behavior is highly evident," explained Rachel Warren Chadd, co-author of "Birds: Myth, Lore and Legend" (Bloomsbury Natural History, 2016).
Many popular accounts trace the myth back to ancient Greece and the story of a vengeful goddess named Hera. According to this story, Hera grew jealous of a beautiful queen named Gerana and transformed her into a stork. The heartbroken Gerana then sought to retrieve her child from Hera's clutches, and the Greeks depicted the transformed bird with a baby dangling from its beak.
But, when doing research for her book, Warren Chadd discovered that the original myth actually describes the baby-snatching bird as a crane, not a stork. "It can be difficult to verify that one species is associated with an ancient myth as, for instance, storks, cranes and herons were often confused," Warren Chadd told Live Science. Similarly, in Egyptian mythology, storks are associated with the birth of the world. But historically, that legendary creature was actually a heron: "A small stretch of imagination might make that a stork," Warren Chadd said.

I'm sorry we had to take a dramatic detour (no trespassing to Live Science) before we could circle back to cranes. And, while we are on this topic, I used to paper fold origami cranes for good luck as a teen.

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So, in the spirit of things, here's some good luck to everyone here! 😊
 
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I'm sorry that the original link I gave you from Live Science had a warning attached to it.
I was able to access this webpage with a message at the top of the story that "Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission " So -- data tracking could be the culprit.

I clean my laptop every evening with CCleaner, which removes any cookies or trackers that could be traced to my computer. I also use Firefox which gives me a warning if any website could be suspicious.

However, I am glad you found the Hera story on your own -- because this fable was also described in the article that I linked to. But here are some excerpts from the Live Science website for you.

What's actually behind this association between storks and babies?
Like any myth, its origins are hard to trace, especially since this one spans the globe, appearing in folklore from Europe, the Americas, North Africa and the Middle East. The array of similar myths suggests that they all draw common inspiration from the birds' most noticeable features.
"The birds are big and white — linked to purity — and their nests are large, prominent and close to where people live. So, their good parenting behavior is highly evident," explained Rachel Warren Chadd, co-author of "Birds: Myth, Lore and Legend" (Bloomsbury Natural History, 2016).
Many popular accounts trace the myth back to ancient Greece and the story of a vengeful goddess named Hera. According to this story, Hera grew jealous of a beautiful queen named Gerana and transformed her into a stork. The heartbroken Gerana then sought to retrieve her child from Hera's clutches, and the Greeks depicted the transformed bird with a baby dangling from its beak.
But, when doing research for her book, Warren Chadd discovered that the original myth actually describes the baby-snatching bird as a crane, not a stork. "It can be difficult to verify that one species is associated with an ancient myth as, for instance, storks, cranes and herons were often confused," Warren Chadd told Live Science. Similarly, in Egyptian mythology, storks are associated with the birth of the world. But historically, that legendary creature was actually a heron: "A small stretch of imagination might make that a stork," Warren Chadd said.

I'm sorry we had to take a dramatic detour (no trespassing to Live Science) before we could circle back to cranes. And, while we are on this topic, I used to paper fold origami cranes for good luck as a teen.

View attachment 24342
So, in the spirit of things, here's some good luck to everyone here! 😊
Thank you for the post and info ... I use Firefox and have McAfee and its pretty picky about where I can go with links sometimes.

I love your origami crane. I'm glad I don't get into this clever craft ... I fear I would be making huge intricate paper sculptures and hang them all over my home and then freak out when they move with the breeze or when I'm drinking beersicles that have melted.
 
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