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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Does anybody know what the difference is between Splendids and Turquosine Parakeets? I know they are both Neophemas and they look so much alike! Maybe vocalizations differ or maybe it's just physical looks? Just wondering. They are both so beautiful and seem like they would be pleasant little birds to have around.:)
(As a side note, Red Rumps always looked very similar to me as well but I know they are in a different family)
I wish I lived near a big bird store or something so I could see birds like this in person. :eek:
 

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From what I've seen I'm pretty sure it's the fact that the splendid has a red chest haha!
 

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Neophemas

I know all the Neophema parrots (Splendids, Turquoise, Red-Rumped) hybridize easily so you shouldn't keep them in the same enclosure if you let them breed. However interesting hybrids might be, it's not a good idea to cross these species because they end up being of no value to future breeders and may be difficult to re-home since people want the pure species.

Bourke parakeets are related to the Neophemas but are now considered to be a different Genus (Neopsephotus). Bourkes will not breed with the Neophemas, so they are safe in the same enclosure. However, read up on all these grass parakeets before you try breeding them in the same aviaries because I think some of them can get aggressive towards other Neophemas and other parrot-family birds when nesting.

As for pet quality, I have both a hand-raised Bourke and a hand-raised Splendid. Both are fairly tame but the Bourke is friendlier and more people-oriented. My Splendid now flies over to me because I hand feed him hemp seeds, which he loves, both otherwise is more reserved in his personality. But he's coming along slowly. But a hand-raised Bourke is more like a tame Budgie in personality. I like having both and appreciate their differences. Mine are fully flighted and come and go, as they please, when they are out of their cages.











To show you how friendly a Bourke can be, here is Twitter sitting on the head of the carpenter I hired last winter to re-do my kitchen. She just flew over to him on her own, to check him out.



Here's the finished kitchen, by the way. I came out pretty nice!
 
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I purchased a bird a year ago who was sold as a male splendid. Several months later, when no red color appeared, I had the bird dna sexed. It was a female. However, the store manager also got to looking at the bird and came to believe the bird was a turquosine hen who had been represented as a splendid. He did not believe the misrepresentation was intentional. The hens are very, very similar. The ceres are slighly different, and there is a different color bar under the wings. He also had her female clutchmate. He found that the cere that these particular birds had was what was described as the turquoisine cere, but they had the splendid underwing coloration. Since he couldn't identify for certain the species, and the birds could very possibly have been hybrids, he took the bird back for a full refund.

The bird was very sweet, but more skittish than our handfed bourkes even though we had purchased both birds while they were still handfeeding, visited with them during that process, and brought them home immediately. The splendid/turquosine was a very easy keeper, eating anything offered and most especially preferring the healthiest offerings. She loved toys and was quite active and fun to watch. Her song was beautiful. I suspect the male's would be even nicer. She was as gentle as the bourkes and never offered to bite.

I wish I could tell you which species she was, or if she was a hybrid. I don't expect to ever know for certain.
 
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Your hybrid?

Nanay,

Why did you return your hybrid parakeet? It sounds like she was a nice bird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ron, I was actually asking for curiosities sake. i was wondering if maybe i had missed something in my reading :p I would not want to hybridize birds, I agree with you about species preservation :) I appreciate your thoughts and the beautiful pics of your birds. I remember seeing pics of them on another forum and thinking how lucky they are with such a nice setup! By the way, awesome kitchen! That stove looks wonderful. I'm big into cooking and baking but I have an electric stove and I sure miss having a gas stove!
@Nanay-Interesting! Was she just not the bird you wanted?
 

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Ron and Rosyshalice,
The hybrid was a very sweet bird, but she was also very flighty. She definitely was not the bird I was told I was purchasing, a male splendid, and we could not even determine exactly what she was. The store offered to take her back for a full refund. The misidentification had been unintentional and they wanted to make it right. They already had another home for her where she was wanted for who she was, by that I mean the new home knew exactly what they would be getting. I was very disappointed she wasn't what I had purchased, and her flightiness was difficult to live with in my situation because when she would take flight in a panic all of my other birds would, too. I thought it was best to return her.
 

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That's such a shame nanay. I'd hate to have bought her home to find out she wasn't what I thought and then get rid of her. Poor thing. Not her fault though. I hope somebody bought her after that hehe :)
 

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She is in a great home. She wasn't in the store a week when I took her back because they already had a plan for her. That was one of the main reasons I returned her, because she was wanted for what she was there.
 

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awwh that's cool then :)
 
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