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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, moments ago J. burst into our tiny abode, excited about a new backyard wild songbird discovery. Identification was verified through our Canadian Birds illustrated pocket field guide, and browsing through the online Cornell Lab All About Birds Bird ID --
Eastern Meadowlark Sturnella magna
  • ORDER: Passeriformes
  • FAMILY: Icteridae


Basic Description
The sweet, lazy whistles of Eastern Meadowlarks waft over summer grasslands and farms in eastern North America. The birds themselves sing from fenceposts and telephone lines or stalk through the grasses, probing the ground for insects with their long, sharp bills. On the ground, their brown-and-black dappled upperparts camouflage the birds among dirt clods and dry grasses. But up on perches, they reveal bright-yellow underparts and a striking black chevron across the chest.

~ J. spotted this songbird as it landed on the rail of our back deck. YAY!
 
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Very nice .... a new birb in the hood. I like that it looks like a bleached out beach bum starling with a goldfinch mix on its belly. Quite the looker this birb!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very nice .... a new birb in the hood. I like that it looks like a bleached out beach bum starling with a goldfinch mix on its belly. Quite the looker this birb!
After I posted this thread, J. returned to the back deck, noticing that the Eastern Meadowlark had met up with his mate. And J. could tell that the hen was ready to lay her eggs -- with a big belly all swollen and fluffy. So now it is confirmed we have two ready-to-be proud Meadowlark parents in our sights -- how exciting is that?

Other backyard bird news -- J. noticed that an unshelled peanut had fallen to the ground (left behind by a blue jay or grey squirrel, perhaps) and a robin was curious about this legume and tossed it around for a bit before eating it. So there! Worms and grubs are not always on the menu for an inquisitive robin who likes to play with its food. 😄
 
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After I posted this thread, J. returned to the back deck, noticing that the Eastern Meadowlark had met up with his mate. And J. could tell that the hen was ready to lay her eggs -- with a big belly all swollen and fluffy. So now it is confirmed we have two ready-to-be proud Meadowlark parents in our sights -- how exciting is that?

Other backyard bird news -- J. noticed that an unshelled peanut had fallen to the ground (left behind by a blue jay or grey squirrel, perhaps) and a robin was curious about this legume and tossed it around for a bit before eating it. So there! Worms and grubs are not always on the menu for an inquisitive robin who likes to play with its food. 😄

To Hell with them Damn Noisy ROBINS ..... I hate them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To Hell with them Damn Noisy ROBINS ..... I hate them!
Now, now, Mr. P -- not all robins are like Rudy.

The ones around our neighbourhood are quite civil and friendly. You'd change your mind about American robins if you met the sweet birbs in our backyard.

Also, J. has spotted a cardinal couple a yard over from ours. Perhaps you would like them better. They tend to stay away from other birbs in our vincinity, and are very quiet. The only thing loud about the male are his red vestments shining in the sunlight.🌞
 
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Now, now, Mr. P -- not all robins are like Rudy.

The ones around our neighbourhood are quite civil and friendly. You'd change your mind about American robins if you met the sweet birbs in our backyard.

Also, J. has spotted a cardinal couple a yard over from ours. Perhaps you would like them better. They tend to stay away from other birbs in our vincinity, and are very quiet. The only thing loud about the male are his red vestments shining in the sunlight.🌞
I would gladly have a cardinal ... I use to have a nice pair who hung out in my yard but we've had some serious Asian long-horned beetle infestations in my neighborhood and several huge trees have fallen or been cut down due to disease of the beetles. I guess there isn't as much real estate around here anymore. Sad because that male cardinal was a looker!

There has been the odd blue jay around here in the wee hours of the morning .... that's when I don't mind Rudy's noisy chatter. Blue Jays are HORRIBLE!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would gladly have a cardinal ... I use to have a nice pair who hung out in my yard but we've had some serious Asian long-horned beetle infestations in my neighborhood and several huge trees have fallen or been cut down due to disease of the beetles. I guess there isn't as much real estate around here anymore. Sad because that male cardinal was a looker!

There has been the odd blue jay around here in the wee hours of the morning .... that's when I don't mind Rudy's noisy chatter. Blue Jays are HORRIBLE!
Please don't mention to J. how horrible you think blue jays are . . we have a whole family of these birbs flying to our deck for peanuts. The youngsters of the blue jay family have come to feast these days, as well, much to J.'s delight. This afternoon I joined J. on the deck to watch the junior jays fly in for a spell, before darting off with their nutty treats.
 
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Please don't mention to J. how horrible you think blue jays are . . we have a whole family of these birbs flying to our deck for peanuts. The youngsters of the blue jay family have come to feast these days, as well, much to J.'s delight. This afternoon I joined J. on the deck to watch the junior jays fly in for a spell, before darting off with their nutty treats.
I like Jays ... I do.

I just don't like noisy loud mouth schnook jays .... too mouthy! But they are interesting and colorful and so entertaining when they want to be. You are very fortunate to have a birb party at your home .... I bet its so interesting to watch all the birbs come to your yard.

We have squirrels here ... about a million of the little brats. More squirrels then there are NUTS! Not many birds besides wild pigeons and a few sparrow type little things. Not much wildlife in the middle of a big ole city.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I like Jays ... I do.

I just don't like noisy loud mouth schnook jays .... too mouthy! But they are interesting and colorful and so entertaining when they want to be. You are very fortunate to have a birb party at your home .... I bet its so interesting to watch all the birbs come to your yard.

We have squirrels here ... about a million of the little brats. More squirrels then there are NUTS! Not many birds besides wild pigeons and a few sparrow type little things. Not much wildlife in the middle of a big ole city.
Hey, I was wondering if you have seen an indigo bunting in your area. These birbs are the size of small sparrows, but during the mating season the males are bright blue, like a jay. Their breeding area extends along Southern Ontario, so I will try to keep my eye open for any, here, in the Thousand Islands. More will come to you if you put out seeds in your feeder. (After consulting my Pocket Birds of Canada guide, I discovered that they prefer weedy fields, edges of forests, and corn fields -- as well as sunflower gardens -- as preferred habitat.) --The info in italics is mine -- due to the picture below.
I was greeted with a daily desktop pic of an indigo bunting on a sunflower this morning.

24344


24345


More about this sweet little jewel of a birb from the Cornell Lab: All About Birds Guide | Cornell Lab -- Indigo Bunting Good luck with your birb watching!
 
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Hey, I was wondering if you have seen an indigo bunting in your area. These birbs are the size of small sparrows, but during the mating season the males are bright blue, like a jay. Their breeding area extends along Southern Ontario, so I will try to keep my eye open for any, here, in the Thousand Islands. More will come to you if you put out seeds in your feeder. (After consulting my Pocket Birds of Canada guide, I discovered that they prefer weedy fields, edges of forests, and corn fields -- as well as sunflower gardens -- as preferred habitat.) --The info in italics is mine -- due to the picture below.
I was greeted with a daily desktop pic of an indigo bunting on a sunflower this morning.

View attachment 24344

View attachment 24345

More about this sweet little jewel of a birb from the Cornell Lab: All About Birds Guide | Cornell Lab -- Indigo Bunting Good luck with your birb watching!
I WISH I Had some indigo buntings in my hood ... they are gorgeous!

Nope ...... none of them here, I have a ton of morning doves .... a ton of feral wild pigeons ... a ton of sparrows and a ton of RUDY THE RUDES. In the deep dark cold winter I get the rare glimpse of a cardinal and I see a huge bunch of JUNCOS ... which are so cool and cute and I call them the oreo birbs. But there isnt a whole lotta other birbs here.

Being in the middle of the city has its disadvantages sometimes ... I have a million squirrels and there are 3 moms of raccoons with about 14 babies between them all, who drop by each evening to swim in a huge bucket of fresh cold water I leave out for them day and night. The raccoons are so much fun to watch especially the baby's. They terrorize my neighbor by opening her BBQ and licking the grills and climbing all over her patio furniture and destroy her cushions she has for her outdoor sofa.

Nature at its finest.

We have learned here to not leave seeds or food for the birbs or the critters as there has been a large new population of rats come to the hood since the pandemic. If you don't leave food or seeds out then the birbs have to hunt out what they normally would in the wild. I'm sure my lazy birds all visit houses a few blocks over and come home all fat and happy anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I WISH I Had some indigo buntings in my hood ... they are gorgeous!

Nope ...... none of them here, I have a ton of morning doves .... a ton of feral wild pigeons ... a ton of sparrows and a ton of RUDY THE RUDES. In the deep dark cold winter I get the rare glimpse of a cardinal and I see a huge bunch of JUNCOS ... which are so cool and cute and I call them the oreo birbs. But there isnt a whole lotta other birbs here.

Being in the middle of the city has its disadvantages sometimes ... I have a million squirrels and there are 3 moms of raccoons with about 14 babies between them all, who drop by each evening to swim in a huge bucket of fresh cold water I leave out for them day and night. The raccoons are so much fun to watch especially the baby's. They terrorize my neighbor by opening her BBQ and licking the grills and climbing all over her patio furniture and destroy her cushions she has for her outdoor sofa.

Nature at its finest.

We have learned here to not leave seeds or food for the birbs or the critters as there has been a large new population of rats come to the hood since the pandemic. If you don't leave food or seeds out then the birbs have to hunt out what they normally would in the wild. I'm sure my lazy birds all visit houses a few blocks over and come home all fat and happy anyways.
Aw, Mr. P., we can't leave out seeds for the neighbourhood birbs, here, either -- due to the feral pigeons-takeover. The pigeons have finally left our locale, and we don't want to encourage their return. Sorry to hear about the rat eruption -- I've read of other wild animals that have returned to populated areas unafraid to approach the peopled areas since the pandemic. There was even a bear spotting in our area of the Thousand Islands -- so, sorry, no seeds for that guy!

My next comment ought to be for your weather thread, but I'll plunk my words right here, thanks! Hot, humid weather has meant me in a soft, strapless dress in navy, and J. often only in his jockey shorts that have a tendency to fall down. Right now, however he's got on his plaid boxers with a proper waistband, and a black tee (UNION AND PROUD) so his wardrobe is quite acceptable for now. 😉

We've got two window fans going, and the dehumidifier working overtime, so all is well and good in our household.

If the rain stays away today, and J. and I spend some time on the deck birb-watching, I'll submit another Sweet P. Neighbourhood Birb-Spotting Report next time. Until then, stay well and keep cool! ~ Sweet Parakeet
 
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Aw, Mr. P., we can't leave out seeds for the neighbourhood birbs, here, either -- due to the feral pigeons-takeover. The pigeons have finally left our locale, and we don't want to encourage their return. Sorry to hear about the rat eruption -- I've read of other wild animals that have returned to populated areas unafraid to approach the peopled areas since the pandemic. There was even a bear spotting in our area of the Thousand Islands -- so, sorry, no seeds for that guy!

My next comment ought to be for your weather thread, but I'll plunk my words right here, thanks! Hot, humid weather has meant me in a soft, strapless dress in navy, and J. often only in his jockey shorts that have a tendency to fall down. Right now, however he's got on his plaid boxers with a proper waistband, and a black tee (UNION AND PROUD) so his wardrobe is quite acceptable for now. 😉

We've got two window fans going, and the dehumidifier working overtime, so all is well and good in our household.

If the rain stays away today, and J. and I spend some time on the deck birb-watching, I'll submit another Sweet P. Neighbourhood Birb-Spotting Report next time. Until then, stay well and keep cool! ~ Sweet Parakeet
I look forward to another edition of "Sweet P & J's Hood of Critter Watch!" soon. You have the advantage over me ... you live in the wild! So you have a ton of wildlife I don't have the luxury of seeing.

I hope you and Styling J manage to keep cool and enjoy this crazy weather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I look forward to another edition of "Sweet P & J's Hood of Critter Watch!" soon. You have the advantage over me ... you live in the wild! So you have a ton of wildlife I don't have the luxury of seeing.

I hope you and Styling J manage to keep cool and enjoy this crazy weather.
Ha ha! J and I "live in the wild!" If only! Our old house converted to a triplex faces the main street in our tiny town, but luckily we rent the apartment positioned towards the back yard, which is facing a dirt road which is labeled an alley. But we have a mature maple tree on our lot, and another slightly younger tree to the side, by the fence which divides our back lot. We have an aging deck that brings us up close to the mid-tree tops that the critters love to investigate, because of the enclosed height -- close to the maple tree branches, and near the electrical lines that the birbs like to perch on, and the squirrels use for their acrobatics (high wire act.) We have had a promise that our landlord will be repairing the back deck someday soon -- which is, indeed, promising since J. has part of the railing rigged up with bungee cords to keep it up, and not having it turn horizontal.
But we enjoy our suburban bird blind with the mature maple tree bringing such beautiful shade cover, and just quiet traffic (most times) with our alley view. We also face other homes that bring their backyards to the alley -- and they have mature trees edging their backyard fencing, which the neighbourhood birds enjoy, for certain -- darting from those trees, back to our huge maple, and then to our deck for those peanuts.
J. mentioned that he spotted the cardinal couple, again, today -- while I enjoyed our cool apartment, indoors, watching some classic movies on the computer with ctv.ca for free.

I hope you are making out OK, and not binging on beer-cicles too much! Take care! ~ Sweet P.
 
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Ha ha! J and I "live in the wild!" If only! Our old house converted to a triplex faces the main street in our tiny town, but luckily we rent the apartment positioned towards the back yard, which is facing a dirt road which is labeled an alley. But we have a mature maple tree on our lot, and another slightly younger tree to the side, by the fence which divides our back lot. We have an aging deck that brings us up close to the mid-tree tops that the critters love to investigate, because of the enclosed height -- close to the maple tree branches, and near the electrical lines that the birbs like to perch on, and the squirrels use for their acrobatics (high wire act.) We have had a promise that our landlord will be repairing the back deck someday soon -- which is, indeed, promising since J. has part of the railing rigged up with bungee cords to keep it up, and not having it turn horizontal.
But we enjoy our suburban bird blind with the mature maple tree bringing such beautiful shade cover, and just quiet traffic (most times) with our alley view. We also face other homes that bring their backyards to the alley -- and they have mature trees edging their backyard fencing, which the neighbourhood birds enjoy, for certain -- darting from those trees, back to our huge maple, and then to our deck for those peanuts.
J. mentioned that he spotted the cardinal couple, again, today -- while I enjoyed our cool apartment, indoors, watching some classic movies on the computer with ctv.ca for free.

I hope you are making out OK, and not binging on beer-cicles too much! Take care! ~ Sweet P.
Dirt road? an alley? YOU LIVE IN THE WILD! Enjoy it ... its probably a lot cooler there then it is in a concrete glass metal city ... why would wild life want to live here?

Enjoy your suburban oasis with a wonky deck and a cool yard that lets you see all sorts of goodies from inside and out. It sounds peaceful there!
 
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