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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, does anyone know any birds breeds that are good for outdoor aviary, for beginners and are friendly, loving birds?
 

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cockatiels and budgies for sure
 

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Cockatiels are wonderful. I believe that was an excellent choice if you are still interested in cockatiels. As the others said, budgies and bourkes are also wonderful. My daughter has a hand-fed bourkes, and she is very personable. Another larger bird I think you can get in Australia is a Princess of Wales parakeet or a Rock Pebbler.

Kate has avaries in Australia, so I believe she can be of more help to you than I can. If I remember correctly, you live in Australia and would like to find a friendly bird that will do well in an outdoor aviary. You already have a well-built aviary in which to house the bird.

I believe you were planning on getting just one bird this time, because your lories were not tame, but when the suggestion was made to get a single bird, we were not aware that you plan to keep the bird in an outdoor aviary. Nothing is wrong with keeping your bird in a safe outdoor aviary, but I am wondering if perhaps the advice to get one bird would have been different when taking your housing arrangement into consideration.

I am thinking a single bird might not be as happy in an outdoor aviary as at least a couple of birds. I think it is always nice to have someone to relate to. I believe that cockatiels, bourkes, budgies, Princess of Wales, and Rock Pebblers can all remain friendly even when kept with others of their kind. The important thing would be to pick two birds who are already friendly with humans.

Can you visit with and handle the birds before you buy them? I think you would be happiest if you found a couple of birds, or one bird if you decide to stick with just one, that is friendly with you right from the start.

Can you tell us what species of birds might be available in your area?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all but i am just going to get one bird and i will be able to handle it before i get it and i am not sure about what types are in my area.
 

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I would highly recommend having them indoors then. Keeping them alone may be very uncomfortable for the bird.
 

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Daisy,
She lives with her parents and is not allowed to keep a bird in the house. However, she has a nice outdoor aviary.
 

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Oh! Sorry :eek: I thought she was just adamant that she wouldn't have any more :lol:

I've never kept a single parrot in an aviary but you can do it, I guess you could hang up toys in there and everything and make it interesting for them, like a giant cage. I think a cockatiel will be your best choice
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks daisy, i think the cockatiel will be the one i get but i thought that it can't go outside because of draughts. But i really want one.
 

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No a cockatiel should be fine! Mine used to be out all year round, including in the snow!
 
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I'm glad you got good news, Emily. Thanks for the information, Daisy.
 

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No no they should be fine. The weather in the UK is awful and our birds are great haha :)
 
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I would love to have some birds outside when I move out. A big aviary would be nice, but I don't want to be unreasonable. Hopefully I have a shot at something, though.
 

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In your situation a cockatiel would be the best, but as has been said it needs to be tame before you put it outside. Birds will acclimatize to the outside temperatures given the right circumstances. When I am introducing a new bird to an outside aviary I wait until the weather is warming up. In Sydney this is usually the middle to the end of September. At the beginning of September it will often be lovely and warm during the day and then cool off alot overnight. Around the second week there will often be a flash back to winter and you get a really cold period. This is the time of year that a particular type of egg binding occurs in some birds. The longer daylight hours and warm days trigger the breeding response and the birds will mate, the cold snap hits right when they would be due to lay the first egg. Because of this the muscle tend to contract and the bird cannot pass the egg. They can look fine the night before and when you check in the morning the hen is dead on the nest. No chance to save a bird with this type of egg binding. I call it the Change of Season Egg Binding. No warning no treatment. I wait until later in the month to pair up and put nest boxes in to help prevent this. So the last part of September is when I introduce a bird to the outside aviary. They then acclimatize to the hot weather and then when summer is over they get time to acclimatize to the winter. Where I am we can get temperatures in the late 40's to the early 50's C in summer and down to the minus' in winter. Yesterday here the high temperature was 9C at 3pm so it was freezing. So you can imagine what it was like overnight and early morning. Not nice. If the bird came from an outside aviary with similar temperatures to my place I can introduce them at anytime of the year, they are already acclimatized. But not if the bird is used to being inside.

If you are allowed to get 2 birds it would be better and both still have to be tame to keep them tame. Other species that are good are as said Princess Parrots or even Alexandrines. But again they have to be tame first. My Yeti and Yowie (Alex's) are outside in an aviary and I can still handle them with ease. Princess Parrots are the same but even aviary bred birds can become so used to you going into the aviary they will come and land on you, but it is better if they are tame to start off with. Just be careful when leaving the aviary that the bird is not on your shoulder. You can often forget they are there. I like low narrowish doors so I can literally scrape the bird off my shoulder to get out. Big normal sized doors can be dangerous as the bird can escape over your head trying to follow you out. And sliding doors are just a pain. A small hinged door is best.
 
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