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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone I will bringing home my little one next week and I'm excited; but wondering what else I'll need to make the transition as comfortable as possible- he's still weaning at the moment. Do they need toys or anything to make them more comfortable? Please let me know- thanks!
 

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I hear meyers like foraging toys, toys they can kinda figure out like things with lids that they open up to find a treat, im sure theyd like bells also,

Do you have the cage set up?
 

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Yes, your bird will definitely need toys. Nevertheless, you may find that you need to teach him/her to play. That is very normal with pois, and most especially with meyers.

My African birds like toys made with paper, grass, wicker, cardboard, soft wood, hard wood, plastic, acrylic, shoe strings, sisal rope, feathers, leather, and stainless steel. They love to swing from toys while playing with and attacking them or other nearby toys. They also enjoy natural toys like clean, safe twigs, leaves, pine cones, carrots, broccoli, and whole kale leaves.

You will need a variety of perches, mostly branches of various types and diameters of wood and rope. You can also use a dowel rod perch if one comes with your cage and a few other things such as a perch for filing nails, of which there are many varieties, a calcium or other type edible perch, a platform perch, and/or an acrylic or pvc swing or other type perching toy. Some of these perches should swing or sway. My birds especially like boings, which are rope or plastic coils that you can hang so that they either spiral down or across the cage, and rope swings. The favorite rope swing for nearly all of them is a triangle that hangs horizontally, but some of them also like a rope orb or a series of rope circles. Both of my African birds also love powder coated metal rings that they can hang unside down from and do flips through. (I should also mention that both LOVE to do gymnastic moves on the metal rings that hold their food dishes whenever I am servicing their food dishes. They seem to be having contests with one another every morning, beeping, clicking, and laughing as loudly as they can the entire time. :rolleyes:)

I should caution, however, that pois are clumsy when first weaned and prone to developing phobias, so at first you don't want to go overboard with acrobatic type toys. If they fall hard they may become afraid to ever play in their cages. It doesn't take long for them to become very athletic, but if you are bringing home a very, very young bird, you might even want to put soft clothes on the bottom of the cage for a few weeks.

I am not a big fan of huge cages for pois. My senegal's best cage is 22" deep X 24" wide X 39" tall. (These are the actual inside cage dimensions.) She is very happy and playful in that cage. She is also very happy and playful in a cage that is 18" deep X 22" wide X 35" tall, and everyone will tell you that is too small for a poi, but she absolutely loves that cage. If I go any larger, she no longer plays with wreckless abandon in her cage. I have been told my numerous poi owners that their pois are exactly the same way when given cages that are too large. Understand that your individual bird will have its own tolerance for what is too large and what is too small, but the universal that I have found with pois is that if they are not playing like fools in a cage, they do not feel safe there, and often it is because the cage is too large. It is also VERY important for a poi to have at least one side of the cage against something solid, like a wall. Mine does even better in a corner. Additionally, make sure that the bird has a clue as to what might be coming, so having a cage right beside a door that is closed and then swings open suddenly might not be good.

I have read some books which really helped me get my African birds off to a good start. I will give you the information in another post.
 
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Congrats on getting a meyers! You must share photos. Just get everything you need, I'm sure a good shop will be able to tell you everything you need to get them started off!
 

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I hear meyers like foraging toys, toys they can kinda figure out like things with lids that they open up to find a treat, im sure theyd like bells also,

Do you have the cage set up?
 

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These are some bird books I would recommend. They are easily found in pet stores in the US.

Guide to the Senegal Parrot and Its Family - by Mattie Sue Athan and Dianalee Deter, published by Barron's. This is a general book about poicephalus. The title would lead you to believe it is more about senegals, but there is just as much information about meyers as about senegals in there.

For the Love of Greys, the Complete Guide to a Healthy and Happy African Grey, by Bobbi Brinker, published by Lucky Press, LLC. This is my favorite book specifically about parrots. In my opinion, it is as applicable to a meyers as it is to a grey. I think all African birds are more similar to one another than to birds from other areas of the world, but I also find my grey and my senegal VERY similar. Additionally, I apply this information to all of my birds, because it is just good parrot information. If you can only afford one book, I would get this one first.

Susan Freidman, Ph.D, helped co-author a few pages in For the Love of Greys. She is a well known human psychologist as well as a parrot behavioralist. To date, I do not know of any books she has published on parrot behavior. If she ever publishes one, I will be getting it.

I have also benefitted from information in Guide to Companion Parrot Behavior, by Mattie Sue Athan, also published by Barron's. That book is very similar to the book by Athan about senegals.

While I am recommending books I might as well recommend my favorite book of all, even though it is not specifically about parrots. Don't Shoot the Dog!, by Karen Pryor, Bantam Books. This is a general animal behavior book. She talks about difference in domesticated and non-domesticated animals, and I believe that is very important information for those who share their homes with parrots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Already thinking of a second bird- any suggestions?

I cant wait for my Meyer's to come home to me in the next week or two! Once she is settled in I would like to get a second bird in a separate cage. I dont want to breed her or pair her up as I want any birds I have to be social, tame and interact with the humans in the house, any suggestions?
 

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My senegal likes watching all sorts of other birds in their separate cages, but she would hurt other birds if I put her too close to them. Our first two birds were the senegal and the bourkes. I like many types of birds. What are you looking for in a second bird?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was looking at conures before I saw my Meyer's I just would like something that would get along together when they were both out of their cages.
 

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Oh - that can never be guaranteen with a poi. They can be very unpredictable and attack all sorts of other birds, even larger birds. They do not have to be this way, but many are. Roni will try to attack every bird in her "area", but she won't go away from one place to get to them to hurt them. She clearly likes having other birds around because she engages in parallel play with the others and imitates their sounds.
 
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