Parrot Forums - TalkParrots banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
And a good place to gather green nesting materials is Ireland!

24303


24304
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mr Peepers

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And a good place to gather green nesting materials is Ireland!

View attachment 24303

View attachment 24304
Here is more about nesting behaviour from Cornell Lab:
Nesting
Nest Placement

Northern Gannets nest at the edge of the sea, on rocky cliffs (often on islands or stacks), sometimes on flat ground or slopes. Most nests are on the windward side of a headland, which provides consistent updrafts that assist birds in takeoff and landing.

Nest Description

The nest is a compressed pedestal of grass, algae, feathers, and mud, held together with excrement. Males do most of the nest building, starting with a scrape and then carefully building up the sides. Gannets build in odd objects found at sea or near the nest site, among them many household items. Nests average about 12 inches across and normally stand 8 inches above the ground, but some have been measured over 40 inches tall.
Nesting Facts
Clutch Size:1 egg
Number of Broods:1 brood
Egg Length:3.0-3.3 in (7.65-8.43 cm)
Egg Width:1.9-2.0 in (4.83-5.09 cm)
Incubation Period:42-46 days
Nestling Period:82-99 days
Egg Description:Pale blue or greenish.
Condition at Hatching:Helpless with little down.
Back to top

Behavior

Northern Gannets are monogamous and mate for life, very much like albatrosses. Pairs form, and renew their bonds, at the breeding colony, called a gannetry, which may contain thousands of pairs in close proximity to each other. Young birds also return to the colony in their second or third year, forming “clubs” of birds that rest together and begin to learn the local fishing routes. Males begin to claim a breeding site in a colony in their third or fourth year, shaking their head side to side frequently, biting the nest site itself, and stretching the neck toward females that show interest. Clashes between males over nest sites can be intense, with bills locked and much pushing at the cliff edge; injuries are not uncommon. Once partnered, male and female greet each other at the nest site each time they reunite, the males shaking the head, the females offering the nape for the male to nibble. They also engage in so-called “mutual fencing,” wherein they face each other, often touching, calling, shaking heads side to side as their bills clack together, bowing, and finally preening each other’s neck. Both parents care for and feed the young, taking turns on fishing excursions that may last several days. Both sexes defend the nest and chicks aggressively against other gannets, using threat displays such as jabbing with the bill. After breeding, they forage off Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence before migrating southward. They spend the nonbreeding months at sea, or in large water bodies such as marine bays. They are usually in sizable flocks executing swift, spectacular dives to capture schooling fish.

Conservation
Conservation Low Concern

Northern Gannet populations appear stable in North America. Partners in Flight estimates a global breeding population of 720,000 and rates the species a 10 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score, indicating it is a species of low conservation concern. The North American Waterbird Conservation Plan puts the North American breeding population at about 155,000 birds. Like most seabirds, gannets are vulnerable to negative impacts on their marine habitat, including toxic contaminants (which often become concentrated in their prey species), plastic and other trash (which they might ingest or become entangled in), and fishing nets (both in active use and discarded). Overfishing of prey species presents a danger to gannets, but the effects of climate change on prey—both in their numbers and their locations—may have even more profound impacts. If prey move too far from gannet nesting areas, the birds cannot nest at that location, and alternate sites may not be available nearer their prey.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mr Peepers

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,038 Posts
Aren't they pretty looking .... nice head feather coloring on all that white face and the dramatic eye make up outline is cool, and the brown spotty wings. Bizarre bird.

I was impressed on their lovely excrement-ed leaf and weed created nest ... I bet them baby's smell sweet! Oddly its the male that does the nest building. I wonder how he came to the conclusion it was a good idea to use some poop with the mud feathers algae grass and other stuff?

Nice pic and info page Sweet P .... danka!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Aren't they pretty looking .... nice head feather coloring on all that white face and the dramatic eye make up outline is cool, and the brown spotty wings. Bizarre bird.

I was impressed on their lovely excrement-ed leaf and weed created nest ... I bet them baby's smell sweet! Oddly its the male that does the nest building. I wonder how he came to the conclusion it was a good idea to use some poop with the mud feathers algae grass and other stuff?

Nice pic and info page Sweet P .... danka!
I'm glad you enjoyed the extra info from Cornell Lab -- the daily desktop image sparked my interest to discover more about the Northern Gannet. Now, Mr. P., did you know that the Northern Gannet also likes to occasionally decorate their nests with man-made objects to make their nests as aesthetically pleasing as possible? Sometimes mud feathers algae grass to mix with poop is just not enough!

24307
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mr Peepers

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,038 Posts
I'm glad you enjoyed the extra info from Cornell Lab -- the daily desktop image sparked my interest to discover more about the Northern Gannet. Now, Mr. P., did you know that the Northern Gannet also likes to occasionally decorate their nests with man-made objects to make their nests as aesthetically pleasing as possible? Sometimes mud feathers algae grass to mix with poop is just not enough!

View attachment 24307
Well ... ain't they the ''Lisa Douglas's'' of ''Green Acres'' in the wilderness, dressing up like they are puttin on da Ritz and decorating their homes with what they like or think is all the new rage.

Gannet's are FANCY!
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top