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This morning here in MD it is cold outside. Our first really cold day of the season...I need to find my heavier coat. I even had to turn on the heat.
So what temperatures do you keep your house at?I have read articles about how our birds can adjust to cooler temperatures then we might think as long as it it gradual and no drafts involved.

I keep my home at 69 during the day and 65 at night. Unless it is really cold outside and no sun and then I crank it up a bit. I cover my birds at night and Parsley has a feather boa that she sleeps between which I would think helps retain body heat. The budgies can snuggle next to each other if need be.

And I have another question that might be silly. I know that many animals grow a heavier coat in preparation for winter. Do birds grow more feathers or thicker feathers as cold weather approaches? Is there a difference between tropical birds and birds that don't migrate for the winter as far as feather growth?
 

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And I have another question that might be silly. I know that many animals grow a heavier coat in preparation for winter. Do birds grow more feathers or thicker feathers as cold weather approaches? Is there a difference between tropical birds and birds that don't migrate for the winter as far as feather growth?
Yes they do but it takes a few seasons to acclimatize and notice that they do grow more down.

All parrots like temps of between 75 and 90 degrees. More importantly is when we start to use artificial heat that we also keep the humidity up (50% or higher is optimal).

Furnaces dry out the air a lot.
 

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Yes they do but it takes a few seasons to acclimatize and notice that they do grow more down.

All parrots like temps of between 75 and 90 degrees. More importantly is when we start to use artificial heat that we also keep the humidity up (50% or higher is optimal).

Furnaces dry out the air a lot.
Wonderful point about the humidity. I run a humidifier in the winter as well and we are looking into getting one put on our furnace. My budgie Spice is prone to sinus infections and since using a humidifier things have been much better for him.
 

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I keep the temp at 72 during the day, 68 at night. All parrots can adjust to temps in the 60's ( some even much lower, think of those kept in outdoor aviaries ) as long as it's not a sudden drop, they need time to acclimatize. I also cover my bird cages at night to keep them cosy and free from any draughts. I have hot water baseboard heat so humidity is not a problem. I also have thermal perches, so if they're feeling chilly they can roost on them. :)
 

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I also have the heat at 72 during the day and 68 at night. Millie and Niblet are also covered. I'm almost ready to get out their heavy winter blanket. We have a humidifier on the furnace and I like the humidity quite high despite the wet windows :eek: I also ensure that the blanket isn't totally covering them for air circulation. So the question is can they be totally covered? :shrug:
 

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We keep it around 75 in the apt.. We have an electric fan heater in the bird/ living room We seal up the windows with indoor shrinkum plastic and use a towel at the front door on the floor. We run the dishwasher on heat dry so it puts out moisture (steam), and we have 2 small aquariums and they evaporate alot! Flannel sheets for the cages. Having a high def flat screen tv keeps it warm also.
 

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I keep the house around 76... but it doesn't exactly get cold down here, I have to worry about the heat! :lol: Have you heard of/tried the heated perches? I've seen them in catalogs but never used them or tried it out, no real need for it! :lol:
 

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I keep the house around 76... but it doesn't exactly get cold down here, I have to worry about the heat! :lol: Have you heard of/tried the heated perches? I've seen them in catalogs but never used them or tried it out, no real need for it! :lol:
Yes Jenny, all 3 of my birds have the thermal perches, I've had them for a few years now and they work very well. They seem to use them more after they've been showered and are preening more than anything, I guess the warmth on their feet helps them dry off and makes them feel snuggly. :giggle:
 

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we keep our heat around 68 day and night. I have never seen a thermal perch?
 

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We keep ours 68 degrees at night and about 70 during the day.

Yes they do but it takes a few seasons to acclimatize and notice that they do grow more down.

All parrots like temps of between 75 and 90 degrees. More importantly is when we start to use artificial heat that we also keep the humidity up (50% or higher is optimal).

Furnaces dry out the air a lot.
Do you keep the humidifier running day and night? I'm guessing so to keep the humidity as at least 50%?

Do you put anything in the water of the humidifier, like GSE, to keep it from getting slimy and growing bacteria?
 

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You can get the thermal perches a lot cheaper if you shop around on online though, ebay and whatnot :p. Foster Smith has great products but they're expensive and the shipping is outrageous.
 

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Oh yeah, I wouldn't buy those from them, but it was the easiest, most straight-forward link I could find :lol:
 

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:lol: I just got an email from Foster Smith saying they're having a special $5.99 flat rate shipping deal, no matter how many items you order. That's a good deal for them, their shipping charges are usually very high. :p
 

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Our house is 72F all the time. Iam not sure if we will turn it up a bit once there is snow on the ground.


We keep ours 68 degrees at night and about 70 during the day.



Do you keep the humidifier running day and night? I'm guessing so to keep the humidity as at least 50%?

Do you put anything in the water of the humidifier, like GSE, to keep it from getting slimy and growing bacteria?
I would not put anything in the humidifier just keep it clean by washing it once in a while. Also be carefull about the hot humidifiers the steam can hurt a bird. I once had to take a hot humidifier back, because after reading the instructions I found out that the heating coil was easy wipe meaning it was teflon (ptfe) coated :yikes: Luckily I never pluged it in. I took it back and got a cold humidifier.
 
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